Departments

Solebury School's curriculum is designed to allow both breadth and depth of study. Working as a team, students, their parents, and their advisors choose a course of study that accomplishes three goals: giving students the tools and background knowledge they need to thrive in college, making them as strong a candidate to colleges as possible, and of course, allowing them to pursue subjects that they are passionate about and that enhance their excitement about learning.

Download Solebury School's current Academic Bulletin 2017-2018 (PDF) or click on the following departments to learn more about the course offerings within each:


English

English is required every trimester because it provides the foundation for success in all disciplines. In English courses, students master the ability to think critically and to express their ideas effectively, both orally and in writing.

We teach English, however, because we love literature and writing, and we strive to share this passion with our students. We believe that reading is an effective vehicle through which students can explore and engage in the world around them. For this reason, we expose students to a broad range of authors and genres from American, British, and World Literature. The core curriculum is supplemented by an array of electives inspired by faculty and student interest.

Furthermore, we believe that there is joy and satisfaction in using words efficiently and effectively. We encourage our students to use writing to enhance their thinking and communicate their thoughts. Students write in many genres, including expository writing, free writing, creative writing, journal writing, playwriting and poetry -- and experience the writing process through editing, revision and proofreading until they are rewarded with a polished final draft.

If you have any questions about Solebury School’s English Department, please contact department chair Sarah Sargent at ssargent@solebury.org or at 215.862.5261

YEARLONG COURSES

ICC English 7/8: The goal of this class is to expose students to the ways in which society developed and explore how literature helps us both understand the world we live in, and imagine the world we wish we could inhabit. As part of the ICC program’s integrated curriculum, this course will encourage students to explore the connections between literature, history, their environment, and personal identity. Students will deepen skills of textual analysis and will be able to understand and interpret both fictional and non-fictional works. The year is divided by trimester into three thematic units, focusing on subjects that include mythology, utopia, dystopia, and social change. Throughout the year, students will work on writing and grammar with a variety of self-reflective, creative, and expository writing assignments as well as pointed vocabulary lessons to deepen students’ understanding of the course readings. Required; ICC English is intended for 7th and 8th graders. 6 credits

English 9: An Introduction to Literary Genres: Students in this course will develop themselves as keen readers of literature through a focus on fiction, poetry, and drama. In addition to reading long-established canonical texts representing each genre, we will also consider contemporary authors working to further those genres today. Despite the vast expanse of time these texts permit us to travel, we will observe a number of persistent themes and questions that have compelled writers to the page for centuries. Where does the individual belong in society? How do our values and beliefs develop out of the tension that question generates? Why do writers employ particular forms and genres in order to engage with those and other questions? What does each genre offer to that engagement? Students will also be asked to hone their own creative and critical writing skills in multiple genres. We will employ a process-based composition model that encourages thoughtfulness and preparation. Recognizing at all times that writing is rewriting, students will work on editing and revising their compositions using a workshop-style model. We will also work on building our fluency with grammatical conventions and vocabulary. This course includes a mandatory summer reading assignment. 6 credits

Honors English 9: An Introduction to Literary Genres: In Honors English 9, students are introduced to the various elements of poetry, drama, and short and long fiction and to the craft of the processed writing. Together we will spend the year reading from a variety of sources, examining the components of poetry, drama, and fiction (short stories and longer works). As we develop close reading skills and master the vocabulary of literary inquiry, we will consider the ways in which individuals, communities, values, and journeys interact, mesh, and conflict. We will also explore the ways in which human beings struggle to create identity, often from a variety of complex factors, and consider how humans develop an internal system of meaning for their lives, influenced by both their own experiences and by the values imposed by society. Classes will consist of discussions, lectures, independent projects, and group work, and a workshop approach to developing formal essays and creative pieces in a variety of modes. Vocabulary development will grow out of work with texts; grammar instruction will be in response to issues that arise in student writing. We will engage in a considerable amount of close reading, with a particular emphasis on examining the author's voice and its role in each text. This course includes a mandatory summer reading assignment. Prerequisite: recommendation of teacher and a B+ or better in 8th grade English class. Honors. 6 credits

English 10: World Literature: In this course, students read and examine world literature and become familiar with certain schools of literary criticism that are useful to an understanding and appreciation of this literature. Through novels, short stories, poetry and oral tales, this class explores literature often overlooked due to the nationality, ethnicity, race or gender of the author. The following questions are examined: 1) Is it important to read mainly from the canon of “great books” from a particular region or from the canon of “great books” of the world? 2) What are the expectations for reading in an academic setting, and why is this style of reading expected? 3) What is to be gained from comparing various literary styles from around the world? 4) How can we use our exposure to various literatures to develop our own writing? 5) When reading literature, is it important to pay attention to the historical context of each work? 6) Is it important to be able to formally analyze literature – and what does formal analysis entail? The course is designed to improve students' skills in writing style, writing mechanics, analysis of texts, and vocabulary. This course includes a mandatory summer reading assignment. 6 credits

Honors English 10: World Literature: Honors English 10 is a world literature course that takes up the same questions and texts as the standard English 10 course and moves beyond those questions and texts to new material. Students interested in the Honors version of English 10 should want the following: to read at a challenging pace which will allow the class to tackle additional material; to move through both the standard English 10 grammar and writing skills as well as advanced grammar and writing skills; to take on a variety of writing challenges that will push students to hone their skills; to master more vocabulary, both as a group and individually, than that taken on in the standard course; and to learn an advanced vocabulary useful in the analysis of texts. Thus, the Honors English 10 course expects extra effort and a greater time commitment from students. The course is built for students who love reading, writing, analysis, grammar, and vocabulary – and who want to be pushed and to collaborate with other likeminded students. This course includes a mandatory summer reading assignment. Prerequisite: recommendation of teacher and a B+ or better in English 9 or a B or better in honors English 9. Honors. 6 credits

English 11: American Literature: In English 11, we read classic and contemporary works by American writers, including (but not limited to) Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Whitman, Dickinson, and Ginsberg. Moving backward in time From the Beat Poets of the 1960s to the origins of our country; students in English 11 are exposed to a broad swath of American literary styles, genres, and approaches. We read Beat and Modernist poems, Lost Generation short stories, a Jazz Age novel, a Red Scare-era drama, and a Shakespearean play, to name a few examples. In addition to the diverse readings, each trimester students study a minimum of three vocabulary lists drawn from the reading, as well as a minimum of three grammar concepts. Students hone their writing skills by writing journals, papers, and 10 creative assignments. English 11 also involves a variety of other assessments including class discussion, peer-editing, tests, and quizzes. This course includes a mandatory summer reading assignment. 6 credits

American Studies (Honors American Literature): This two-period course combines Honors American Literature with AP US History. By focusing on the social and political connections between the literature and the history, we integrate the two disciplines. An in-depth study of American history and the development of a distinct American literature, this course attempts to replicate an introductory college experience in terms of pace, volume, and complexity of the material. Besides reading the major American writers (Irving, Cooper, Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Whitman, Dickinson, Frost, and Ginsberg to name a few), we read first-person accounts by Native Americans, African Americans, and Europeans of first encounters, colonial times, and more recent history. Students take the Advanced Placement Examination in U.S. History given in May by the College Board. Enrollment is limited. This course includes a mandatory summer reading assignment. Prerequisite: recommendation of teacher and a B+ or better in 10th grade English and History. Honors. 12 credits

AP English Literature & Composition: Students enrolled in AP English Literature & Composition will be introduced to the rigors and pleasures of a college-level literature course. In order to prepare students for the breadth of material included in the AP exam, we will consider works of literature from a wide array of periods, movements, cultures, and genres. We will also refine our critical lexicons through an extensive engagement with literary terminology. By developing fluency with that terminology, we will be better prepared to participate in the ongoing conversation of literary study. While the backbone of the course will be thoughtful discussion, students will be asked to complete a number of in-class writing exercises similar to those encountered on the exam. In addition to these in-class writing assignments, students will compose more refined essays and responses out of class, exhibiting the thoughtfulness, structure, and strength of argument necessary for successful writing. Students earning a 3, 4 or 5 on the AP English Literature and Composition examination may be offered college credit and/or advanced placement by the colleges they attend. This course includes a mandatory summer reading and writing assignment. Prerequisite: recommendation of instructor and a B+ or better in American Studies Honors English or an A- or better in English 11. Advanced Placement. 6 credits

Learning Skills English: For a detailed discussion of Learning Skills, please see the “Special Programs” section. 6 credits


FALL TRIMESTER COURSES

Experimental Writers of Color: This elective will look to contemporary writers of color who are engaging in and expanding on the experimental tradition. Unsatisfied with inherited forms and genres, these writers generate bold new works, pushing the limits of what literature can be. While the experimental or avant-garde tradition in literature is well-established, the contributions of writers of color have largely been ignored or underrepresented. Despite this, a tremendous body of work by inventive writers of color has emerged, especially in recent years. The literature we’ll consider consists of fiction, essays, poetry, drama, and film. Often, these genres will combine and blend in ways which demand new considerations and new questions about the notion of genre itself. Expectations include a deep engagement with the material as evidenced by in-class discussion, critical writing, and a substantial creative-critical project. Prerequisite: recommendation of instructor and a B or better in regular English 11, B- or better in American Studies. Honors. 2 credits

Stories of Hurricane Katrina: In August 2005 Hurricane Katrina flattened and flooded land from Florida to Texas. What followed forced America to examine its disaster preparedness, race and class relationships, and fragility of life in the face of nature’s power. Anderson Cooper cried while reporting the news. Kanye West announced, “President Bush doesn’t care about black people.” New Orleans became the focus of the story, even though it wasn’t at the epicenter of the storm. For this class, we are going to study the news stories published during and after the hurricane landed, and the literature the storm has influenced over the past ten years. We will examine news articles, short fiction, graphic novels, and narrative nonfiction to understand the lasting effects of Katrina on American culture. Honors. 2 credits

Refugee Voices: According to the UNHCR (United Nations Refugee Agency), there are currently 65.3 million people around the world who have been forced from their home because of political upheaval, persecution, and environmental disasters. In fact, nearly 34,000 people are displaced every day and the flow of refugees is steadily increasing. What prompts people to leave behind all that they know and love and flee to an unknown future? What greets them in their new homes? How are they viewed and treated? What are their hopes and dreams? What are their strengths and struggles? In this trimester elective, we will seek the answers to these questions and more in the novels, poems, short stories, essays, and songs of refugees and other displaced people. Grades will be determined by informal reaction papers, analytical papers, creative projects, and class participation. This class fulfills a global studies program credit. Global. 2 credits

Personal Essay Writing: You carry countless stories. Your memories, your experiences and your thoughts are all inside you waiting to get out. Here’s your chance to unload. In this class, we will learn how to craft succinct, spellbinding, superb personal essays. Using the self as subject, we will learn how to plumb our own experiences to create riveting, readable, narrative prose. Don’t think you have any stories to tell? Think again. From the weighty to the seemingly small, our stories are what we’re made of. Getting lost on that vacation to Prague? The time you rescued a bird from a fence? The way your mom used to leave you notes in your lunchbox? Visiting your grandmother as she slowly forgot who you were? These are all stories that, when well-crafted and well-written, make great essays. They make readers think, feel and connect. That is our goal. In this class, we want to find the stories inside you that evoke universal ideas and emotions: joy, sadness, fear, truth, identity, wonder. Yes, this class will be helpful to those of you aiming to write an epic college admissions essay. Yet it is also a class for storytellers who want to work on the craft of writing. The focus of the class is on making our essays compelling, vivid, structured and meaningful. Overall, we will find out what stories are hiding inside us, and learn to tell them beautifully. 2 credits

Search for Enlightenment: World Religions in the Postmodern Era: Through materials drawn from anthropology, history, literature, and science, students in this course will examine religious and spiritual practice around the world in order to explore the human search for meaning and the impact of globalization on that search. In addition to examining the well-known texts of “major religions”, we will read works by authors such as Jack Kerouac, Elaine Pagels, Basho, Black Elk, Karen King, John Muir, Che Guevara, and others. While one of the goals of this course is to survey non-Western and Western spiritual practices, we will also seek to understand the way spiritual philosophies and practices have travelled and have been altered in the contemporary era. Through journaling, creative writing, discussion, and research, students reflect upon this material and engage in open-minded discovery. This class may also be taken for Social Studies credit. This class fulfills a global studies program credit. Global, 2 credits 12


WINTER TRIMESTER COURSES

South African Short Fiction: In this class we will study South Africa through short fiction and plays. We will discuss the power of literature as a political tool, and the role of writing for self-actualization. For fifty years, apartheid laws in South Africa imposed racism and segregation on the population. Those who resisted, such as Nelson Mandela, were harshly punished. Writers protested by telling stories, both from within South Africa and from without as exiles. Through their stories, we will explore the complex human experiences in a society divided for many generations by race. This class fulfills a global studies program credit. Prerequisite: recommendation of instructor and a B or better in regular English 11, B or better in American Studies. Global, Honors. 2 credits

Investigative Reporting for Social Change: Words have power. Throughout history, words have brought injustices to light, given voice to the voiceless, and instigated change. Investigative journalists exposed the horrors of concentration camps at the end of World War II, wrote about institutional racism in the south in the 1960s, brought down a president during the Watergate scandal, and shined a needed light on causes that range from excesses of corporate power to abuses in the fast-food industry. What power can your words have? In this class, students will be asked to think about what bothers them, ponder what they wish to change about the world, explore what’s on their minds and write about what should be on people’s minds. Students will first learn the journalistic skills necessary to report information, conduct interviews, and write news articles. Then students choose a topic and write an in-depth investigative piece. To learn about long-form of investigative journalism, we will read Pulitzer Prize-winning articles and watch documentaries, as we seek to learn how to report facts, fight for social justice and write great stories all at the same time. At the end of the trimester, we will create a news website and publish our work. Can your words change the world? Find out. 2 credits

International Horror Literature: Why do we expose ourselves to the horrific in popular culture? Why do we peek from under blankets at ghastly images on screens? Why do we read tales of the supernatural by flashlight in darkened rooms? This attraction to horror persists across borders, spreading around the globe. Despite this shared appeal, horror itself often takes on different tones based on its cultural origin. In this class we will view examples of horror literatures from around the globe, noting how a country or region’s historical positioning influences the content of their contributions to the genre. We will look at works of fiction, film, and poetry from a wide range of countries and cultures. Students will be asked to respond to this work through quizzes, critical writing, film reviews, and a creative project. This class fulfills a global studies program credit. Global. 2 credits

Comingofage.com: Growing up in literature and online: “All children, except one, grow up,” wrote J.M. Barrie to launch the classic story of Peter Pan. Yet how do we all grow up? When does childhood end and adulthood begin? In this class, we will ask ourselves what it means to “come of age” and also explore how the digital age has changed the way we grow up now. Do today’s teens grow up faster? Or do they not grow up at all? To help us answer these questions, we will read coming of age literature -- novels, stories, poems -- to understand what it means to navigate the passage between childhood and adulthood. We will also look at our own digital footprints to explore the consequences of growing up under the constant scrutiny of the internet. Writing assignments will include: expository assignments that analyze coming of age literature and digital citizenship topics, personal coming of age nonfiction essays, and the writing of an original fictional coming of age story. 2 credits

Creative Nonfiction: Some of the most powerful, thoughtful, and culturally significant writing is found in the essays of writers like Joan Didion, David Foster Wallace, and others who are published under the genre “creative nonfiction.” To engage with this historical, observational, and experimental writing form, students will read and analyze essays, produce original content, and give meaningful feedback to one another. The habits and skills developed in this course are useful for those interested in journalism, cultural studies, and creative writing. This class may also be taken for Social Studies credit. 2 credits


SPRING TRIMESTER COURSES

Reading and Writing Poetry: Where and how do poems happen? This workshop will promote a trimester-long conversation about how poets uncover and incorporate poetry in their daily lives. This extended conversation demands a profound openness to exploration and constructive discomfort. Poets in this workshop are asked to experiment with new ways of writing, of reading, and of thinking about language. Our readings will consist of canonical poetry and contemporary writers as well as, of course, the work of one another. Our engagement with these texts will propel our own creative output (poetry is, after all, a conversation) and our critical acumen as readers of literature. Coursework will include quizzes, creative work, in-class presentations, and a final portfolio of revised poems from throughout the trimester. Honors. 2 credits

Diversity in Young Adult Literature (#weneeddiversebooks): The We Need Diverse Books movement started as a hashtag on Twitter in April 2014. Now it’s a national movement to increase diversity in book publishing, especially for children and young adults. For this class, we will first ask, “Why do we need diverse books?” We will discuss the barriers to diverse book publishing and what is being done to get books about all people onto bookshelves. Students will read a selection of books featuring diverse protagonists, as well as choose one independent book for a final scholarly book critique. 2 credits

World Mythology: This course presents an overview of the mythology of several different ancient cultures. The class will investigate Greek, Roman, Celtic, and Egyptian Mythology. We will focus on both the literary and visual; finding the exciting ways each of these glorious societies formed their literary history. Students will examine the nature and social function of mythology, studying different ancient and modern theories, as well as the legacy of classical mythology in modern art, literature, and film. Students will learn how mythic narrative patterns and symbols went on to function within and help shape Western culture. This class fulfills a global studies program credit. Global, 2 credits

Short Story Writing: Character, plot, description, setting, detail, language. These are just some of the elements that draw us into a well-crafted, fictitious world. Short stories are, by definition, brief. Yet the best ones still invite the reader on a complete journey: to meet new people, to experience a new place, and to see, feel and hear a different slice of life. The best stories affect us. The best stories make us care. The best stories linger in our minds long after we have stopped reading them. In this class, we will aim to write our best stories. To do this, we will work on writing techniques, exploring plot, structure, tone, theme, character, dialogue, setting, descriptions, detail and language. Our coursework will focus on writing and rewriting short stories. We will also do several creative writing exercises in class to generate ideas, play with language, and experiment with writing. We will read each other’s short stories, creating a mini Writer’s Workshop to generate useful feedback and constructive criticism. We will also read a wide range of short stories and discuss them in class to find out what makes the good ones so good. At the end of the trimester, we will select a story to send to a literary publication or contest. 2 credits

Baseball: The Story of America: This course will focus on how the sport of baseball has influenced American history and literature. In the end, students will see that the evolution of baseball mirrored the growth of America itself, from the creation of the American identity to race relations and labor management. According to Ken Burns, "The story of baseball is also the story of race in America, of immigration and assimilation; of the struggle between labor and management; of popular culture and advertising; of myth and the nature of heroes, villains, and buffoons." The first part of the course will focus on the history of America's game, from its origins up through the modern era. The second part revolves around the literature (non-fiction and fiction), poetry, and film the sport has inspired, and focuses on two themes: (1) baseball as a means for heroism, and (2) baseball as a source of redemption. 2 credits

Honors Debate: Debate is a dynamic, entertaining, and challenging form of public speaking. To promote its practice, this course will help students explore argument theory, review techniques of persuasive speaking, and give students the opportunity to participate in structured class debates in the style of parliamentary debate. Students will also further develop critical thinking and writing skills by reviewing editorial articles and describing, analyzing, and critiquing methods of persuasion. This class may also be taken for Social Studies credit. Prerequisite: recommendation of instructor and a B or better in regular English 11, B- or better in American Studies. Honors. 2 credits

World Languages

Solebury School’s World Languages Department offers courses in Spanish and French. The goal of our department is to prepare students to communicate successfully in another modern language. Teachers stress active communication and work to develop students' skills in cultural awareness, listening, speaking, reading, and writing. All courses offered in World Languages fulfill a global studies program credit.

Solebury School students are required to complete French III or Spanish III (with a passing average) in order to graduate. [We waive this requirement for students in Learning Skills or English as a Second Language program. Completion of Level II of two languages may be substituted for this path. Students who come to Solebury having completed level II of a language we don’t offer (Latin, etc.) need only complete and pass level II of French or Spanish to fulfill our requirement.] At the end of their three-year requirement, students should be functionally proficient, able to address basic needs and express themselves in straightforward social situations in the target culture. Any student with at least a B- average is strongly encouraged to continue their language studies beyond level III, since many competitive universities expect four or more years of language study.

Our advanced levels (IV and higher) allow students to pursue advanced communication skills and more in-depth cultural studies, including literature, film, and various media. Our Advanced Placement curricula have been approved by the College Board, and in many cases a successful year in an AP language class will afford a student some college credit while still in high school.

Language-Centered Trips:
We at Solebury School believe that practical, real-life language experience is the perfect complement to the classroom. In addition to regular trips abroad to gain practical experience with the languages and cultures that we study in the classroom, we partner with the Haut-Lac Bilingual International School in St. Légier, Switzerland and St. Paul’s School in Barcelona, Spain to provide an extended study abroad experience for interested students. In recent years, Solebury School students and teachers have also gone to Quebec’s winter carnival, to Costa Rica, and to several different regions in France (Paris, the Loire Valley, Normandy, Brittany, Provence, the Pyrenees, and Champagne).

Solebury Language Societies and Model United Nations:
The Solebury Language Society and the Model UN groups meet on a semi-regular basis to promote culture on campus as well as to connect Solebury to the global community. The Language Society sponsors events during and outside the school day, such as an International Movie Night to explore and celebrate the art of cinema in other languages, Language Table Days in the dining hall to practice casual conversation, and several other cultural holidays on campus. The Model UN group studies international affairs and participates in regional and national Model UN events.

If you have any questions about Solebury School’s World Languages Department, please contact department chair Helen Matthews at hmatthews@solebury.org at 215.862.5261.


FRENCH

Why learn French? Aside from the beauty of the language and culture (the food, fashion, art, and literature), there are many practical reasons to study French. French is one of the most commonly used languages on the web, and one of the most important languages in the business world. It is useful and often required for careers in science, technology, medicine, and government. French is one of only two working languages (the other being English) at the United Nations, the Council of Europe, the International Labor Bureau, the International Monetary Fund, and the International Red Cross. French is the first or second language of 49 countries and is spoken by over 220 million people in the world. Finally, France is the number one tourist destination in the world—visited even more than the U.S.

French I: French I offers a tremendous opportunity for students who have no (or limited) experience with the French language. By the end of the year, students will be able to speak and write in many different contexts. Over the course of the year, students cover the first five units of Espaces and its accompanying Supersite, which allows students to speak, listen, read, and write outside the classroom. French I students learn basic phonemes and intonation of the French language, as well as the alphabet and accent marks, and numbers (through one million). They learn greetings, introductions and expressions of courtesy and manners. Their vocabulary study includes: description of people, school, family, professions, home life, sports, leisure activities, food, weather, time, date, clothing, and shopping. Their grammatical study includes: The present and passé composé of regular verbs (-er, -ir, and -re); the verbs être, avoir, aller, and faire and their many idiomatic uses; several other irregular verbs; stem-changing verbs; negation; question formation; articles and markers (including possessive and demonstrative adjectives); noun/adjective agreement; telling time; many prepositions of location. They also begin using object pronouns in their speech to sound more natural. Within their cultural study, students focus on French diversity, the French education system, family life, and French and Francophone traditions, sports, the “café” culture, holidays, and fashion. Global. 6 credits

French II: French II strengthens and builds on what students have learned in French I (or IA & IB). After an initial review of the first five units, students complete units 6 through 10 of Espaces, and its accompanying Supersite. By the end of French II, students will be able to express complex ideas and understand native speakers. Their “survival skills” will increase dramatically; at the end of the year, they could travel to France and really enjoy the people and the culture. Students continue to build vocabulary by theme: vacations and travel, home life, cuisine and cooking, health and daily routine, technology, and transportation. Grammar studies include an expansion of the passé composé, which they use with the imperfect tense to tell meaningful stories in the past. Students also expand their use of object pronouns and irregular verbs. They learn to express reflexive and reciprocal actions, as well as the future and conditional of regular and irregular verbs. Their cultural studies include French and Francophone holidays and vacations, housing, cuisine, health, technology and industry, and city life. Prerequisite: French I. Global. 6 credits

French III: French III strengthens and builds on what students have learned in French I and II. After an initial quick review of the first ten units, students finish the textbook Espaces, with its accompanying Supersite, units 11-15. By the end of French III, students will be able to hold more philosophical and political discussions, and will be able to express more complex ideas in both oral and written French. They will also be able to read authentic literature and articles in French. Students continue to build vocabulary by theme: professions, ecology and the environment, nature and life in the country, art and the arts. Grammar studies include review and expansion of the tenses they have already learned, and an in-depth study of the subjunctive mood. Students also learn advanced structures like demonstrative and possessive pronouns. Their cultural studies include communication in France, labor unions and workers’ rights, national parks in France, and the arts in France and Francophone countries. Prerequisite: French II. Global. 6 credits. 7

French IV: In French IV, conducted exclusively in French, students review and expand their skills in spoken and written French. As they continue thematic vocabulary and grammar review and expansion (shorter grammar lessons than in years past), they will also read complex French and Francophone literature and periodicals, and they will watch French news, films, and videos. By the end of the year, they will be able to hold a normal conversation in French on a wide variety of topics, including politics and more philosophical subjects. Fourth-year classes are typically where students’ communication skills really take off! At the end of this year, students should be prepared either to take AP French, or to enter a third-year university French course. Our primary tool in class is the textbook, Rêvez, with the accompanying Supersite and workbook. We use many other sources, though, such as technology, film, music, literature, and periodicals. Assessments include regular oral presentations, tests, quizzes, and compositions for each chapter of the book. Prerequisite: French III. Global, 6 credits

AP French Language: The AP French Language course is designed to provide students with the tools to improve their communicative abilities in French – spoken and written. This class, which is conducted exclusively in French, is comparable in difficulty to a third-year college class. We use a textbook (Allons au-delà), but many other sources as well – French news, music, film, literature and art. Our goals are simple but demanding: To expand vocabulary, to improve intercultural understanding, and to become proficient in each area of communication (interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational) in spoken and written French. The course hinges on six major themes: Global Challenges, Science & Technology; Contemporary Life, Personal & Public Identities, Family & Communities, and Beauty & Aesthetics. We will engage each of these themes, with an eye to the past, present, and future. Prerequisite: B- or better in French IV. Global, AP. 6 credits


SPANISH

A recognized language of the United States (the U.S. is the second largest Spanish-speaking country), Spanish is also a useful language all over the world. The number of books published in Spanish worldwide is second only to the number published in English. Spanish language fluency could be important to a career in journalism, government, education, medicine, law, medicine, business, and many others. Knowing Spanish increases tremendously the number of TV programs, books, movies, records, etc., that you can enjoy, as well as opening doors in this country and abroad.

Spanish I: Spanish I offers a comprehensive introduction for students who have no (or limited) experience with the Spanish language. This course is a listening-based and story-based course which teaches grammar and vocabulary inductively through the use of reading, listening, interactives stories, songs, videos, online activities and authentic resources. Students will read 2 novels designed for language learners in class, watch music videos and use the program Q-Talk to learn language in context. Cultural information relevant to Spanish-speaking countries and culture permeate the content from beginning to end. Global. 6 credits

Spanish II: By the end of the year students in Spanish II will be able to comprehend and communicate both verbally and in writing using the past, present, and future tenses, and will be able to conjugate in subjunctive mood. They will be able to differentiate between formal and informal language styles, and discuss cultural topics such as art, music, and politics. The goal is to make students functional travelers who can enjoy and understand the cultural differences around them, and also to make students confident communicators with the Hispanics they encounter in their surroundings. After a review of Spanish I curriculum, the Spanish II program will include: - Development of vocabulary - Review of verb usage and tenses, including reflexives - The preterit - An introduction to conjugating the subjunctive - Focus on conversation and communication - Cultural studies, including readings, movies, and projects relating to Peru, Chile, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Argentina, and Panama. Prerequisite: Spanish I. Global., 6 credits

Spanish III: Spanish III strengthens and builds on what students have learned in Spanish I and II. After an initial quick review of prior content, students continue to build vocabulary and culture by theme. Grammar studies include review and expansion of the tenses they have already learned, and an indepth study of the subjunctive, the use of preterit and imperfect together, relative pronouns, the imperative, present and past perfect tenses, adverbs and more. Students will learn language in context through the use of novels, music, videos, journal-writing, readings, and authentic resources. Cultural topics include dialectal differences, slang, holidays and customs. Prerequisite: Spanish II. Global., 6 credits

Spanish IV: Spanish IV will expand the student’s understanding of language, culture, and literature in Spanish, in order to find new personal interests, abilities, and knowledge. By the end of the year students will read a full-length novel, read and create poetry, and will have further experience in the differences between formal and informal language usage. They will be able to write, speak, and understand complex grammar structures such as compound tenses and multiple clauses with ease. By the end of the year, they will be ready for AP Spanish or a third-year university course. Other notes about Spanish IV: - Everything (instruction, assessments, and student work) in 100% Spanish. - Focus on speaking and communicating, with class presentations and dialogues. - Review and expansion of basic verb tenses and compound tenses - Greater focus on subjunctive - Cultural studies: Hispanic families, women’s issues, the war on drugs, and food politics are some of the issues we tackle through readings, research projects, movies and documentaries. Prerequisite: Spanish III. Global. 6 credits

AP Spanish Language: By the end AP Spanish Language, students should expect to hold lengthy conversations about a variety of academic and casual topics in Spanish. Similarly, students will deepen their knowledge of written Spanish both in academic formats and letter writing, as well as creative writing. In preparation for the specific tasks on the AP Exam, students will engage in authentic language sources and will use intense grammar and vocabulary study to enhance competency in reading, writing, speaking and listening. The Temas book is used for practicing many of these AP tasks, although students will receive a packet of ancillary materials for each trimester, including literary and cultural selections, grammar reference and exercises, and further AP activities. At the end of this year, students should be ready for an upper-level university course in Spanish – and a wide variety of real-life experiences using the Spanish language. Prerequisite: B- or better in Sp. IV Honors. Global, AP., 6 credits

Mathematics

The primary goal of the Mathematics Department is to develop a curriculum sequence that meets the academic needs of all Solebury School students. Above all, students are encouraged to achieve their highest mathematical potential. Many students desire an aggressive math sequence that provides enriching, challenging opportunities, whereas other students look for a program that will build their confidence and comfort level with a discipline that is difficult for them. In developing a curriculum sequence, we recognize that students come from diverse backgrounds and therefore students are placed into courses that will best fit their individual needs.

The department offers courses that range from Pre-Algebra to Multivariable Calculus. Additionally, the department offers electives each year that provide students with an opportunity to explore, analyze, and appreciate mathematics through a nontraditional approach. Three years of mathematics are required for graduation with the typical sequence of courses consisting of Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II and Trigonometry. However, with permission of the Mathematics Department Head and the Director of Studies, certain other paths are possible. Students are encouraged to communicate with their math teacher, school adviser, and parents as they determine the appropriate sequence of courses for their high school program. Additionally, it is important for students in their sophomore and junior years to check the mathematics requirements of potential colleges, as many universities recommend (or require) four years of math from applicants.

All students enrolled in high school math courses (Algebra I and higher) are required to obtain a graphing calculator. Today, calculators are an integral component of the learning process and students need to be adept at using this technology. Additionally, a graphing calculator is required by most colleges as well as on standardized math tests such as the SAT, ACT, SAT II subject tests, and the AP Calculus and Statistics exams. The department strongly recommends that students purchase a TI-84 Plus. The school has a small supply of calculators that can be lent to students for the school year if needed and are distributed on a first come, first served basis. Students who are enrolled in AP Calculus BC are required to have a TI-89 graphing calculator as this calculator allows students to explore concepts and functions that were previously difficult or impossible to examine without the use of computer software programs.

If you have any questions about Solebury School’s Mathematics Department, please contact department chair Britta Milks at bmilks@solebury.org or 215.862.5261


MATH SUPPORT PROGRAM

Math Support Program (MSP) is a learning enrichment and support program which provides innovative resources and a nurturing environment to support the math curriculum at Solebury School. This program includes three main components:

  • Algebraic Concepts I
  • Algebraic Concepts II
  • Geometry Concepts

Algebraic Concepts Course I and II and Geometry Concepts
This three-year math sequence is for students with math disabilities or significant difficulties with math. For some students, one year with math support is needed followed by mainstreamed classes. For others, support is provided for all three levels of mathematics: Algebraic Concepts I, Geometry Concepts and Algebraic Concepts II. Successful completion of this three year sequence fulfills graduation requirements. We offer Algebraic Concepts I every year and teach the Geometry or Algebraic II course every other year.

  • Students will discover the fundamentals of algebra through a multisensory and multidimensional type of curriculum.
  • By the end of the year of Algebraic Concepts I, students in the program will have a stronger foundation in algebraic concepts. This foundation includes: number sense, operations, analytical analysis, multi-step equations, problem solving, as well as procedural and computational fluency.
  • By the end of the year of Algebraic Concepts II, students in the program will have studied the main topics inherent to an Algebra curriculum. These topics include: linear, quadratic, and polynomial functions, radicals, data analysis, exponential functions, and problem solving skills.
  • By the end of the year in Geometry Concepts, students in the program will have a stronger understanding of two-dimensional plane Geometry as it applies to polygons, stronger critical thinking skills as it applies to conjectures in proofs, and stronger spatial reasoning.
  • Technology will be infused whenever appropriate.
  • Additional information and admission requirements provided on the Algebraic Concepts fact sheet.

If you have any questions about Solebury School’s Math Support Program, please contact the director of the program, Dr. Jen Perez at jperez@solebury.org or 215.862.5261


YEARLONG COURSES

Pre-Algebra: This course studies the mathematical concepts that are essential prerequisites for Algebra I. Arithmetic operations using the rational number system are examined, with an emphasis placed on signed numbers. Students review and extend their knowledge of ratios, proportions, percent, exponents, basic geometry, probability, mental math, and the metric system. They learn to solve multi-step equations and inequalities, graph linear equations, and use scientific notation. Independent work as well as group work is used as a teaching tool to foster student learning and throughout the course an emphasis is placed on critical thinking skills using word problems and problem solving situations. To prepare for the demands of a high school mathematics course, study strategies, organization, and note taking techniques are underlying skills that Pre-Algebra students develop and practice throughout the year. This class is intended for Middle School students. 6 credits

Algebra I: This course thoroughly examines basic algebraic principles. Topics covered include simplifying expressions using the appropriate order of operations, solving first and second degree equations in one variable with both algebraic and graphical methods, solving absolute value equations and inequalities, and the concept of functions. Additionally, students will simplify and solve rational equations as well as examine the basic principles surrounding radical expressions. Students will explore linear and quadratic functions, as well as systems of equations in two variables. Throughout the course, an emphasis will be placed on solving real-world problems with both algebraic and graphical processes. 6 credits

Honors Algebra I: A faster-paced and more in-depth analysis of the topics covered in Algebra I. Additional topics in this course may include an introduction to right triangle trigonometry as well as basic principles of probability and statistical analysis. Honors. 6 credits

Algebraic Concepts I: Students will discover the fundamentals of algebra within this course. They will be taught through a multisensory and multidimensional type of curriculum. This course is slower-paced with built-in support for reaching and furthering the analysis of topics covered in Algebra I. These fundamentals include number sense, operations, analytical analysis, two-step equations, problem-solving, procedural and computational fluency. Technology will be infused whenever appropriate. Enrollment in this course is predicated on joining the Math Support Program and entails an additional fee. For a description of the broader program, please see the information above in the Math Department section. Prerequisite: Pre-Algebra or recommendation of math department. 6 credits

Geometry: The purpose of the course is for students to discover the conjectures and definitions of geometry through hands-on investigations. Students will learn to apply deductive and inductive reasoning as they examine geometric proofs. Relationships and properties such as congruence and similarity will be examined in depth. Additionally, students will investigate the properties of circles, right triangle trigonometry, and formulas relating to plane and solid figures. Inherent in the course is the development of critical thinking skills, logic, and geometrical visualization. Time permitting; an exploration of symmetry and/or a review of algebra will be included at the conclusion of the course, as most students will be entering Algebra II the following year. Prerequisite: Algebra I. This course may be taken concurrently with Algebra II. 6 credits

Honors Geometry: A faster-paced and more in-depth analysis of the topics covered in Geometry. This honors version of Geometry is intended for students who plan to follow mathematics through Calculus. There will be greater emphasis on critical thinking skills and proofs. Prerequisite: Algebra I. This course may be taken concurrently with Algebra II. Honors. 6 credits

Algebraic Concepts II: This course is recommended for students who need math support and are interested in developing greater strength on coursework related to algebraic concepts and functions. Content is similar to the regular Algebra 2 and Trigonometry course, however, the pace is slower and the material focuses on algebraic material and does not cover trigonometry. This course counts as part of the three-year graduation sequence for mathematics. Enrollment in this course is predicated on joining the Math Support Program and entails an additional fee. For a description of the broader program, please see the information above in the Math Department section. Prerequisite: Algebra I or Algebraic Concepts I. 6 credits

Algebra II and Trigonometry: This course is recommended for students who need a moderately paced approach to Algebra II. The subject matter includes a brief review of first-degree polynomials followed by an in-depth study of higher-power polynomials, conic sections, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Attention is given to the relationship between functions and their graphs. This course enables students to move on to the regular Pre-Calculus class, and it fulfills the graduation requirement. Prerequisite: Algebra I. 6 credits

Honors Algebra II and Trigonometry: A faster-paced and more in-depth analysis of the topics covered in Algebra II and Trigonometry. This course is recommended for students who plan to follow mathematics through Calculus. Students in this course will be prepared for Honors Pre-Calculus. Prerequisite: B or better in Algebra I. Honors. 6 credits

Pre-Calculus: The first two trimesters of this course are designed to further the study of trigonometry and its applications. Topics will include the unit circle, the six trig functions, trig identities, the law of sines, the law of cosines, “real world” applications of these functions, and selected applications in physics. The third trimester will introduce functions and relations focusing on conic sections, exponential, logarithmic, and rational functions. This course enables students to move on to the Calculus AB course. Prerequisite: B or better in Alg II and Trig or permission of instructor. 6 credits

Honors Pre-Calculus: This honors course is for students who have a very strong background in Algebra II and Trigonometry. The first trimester covers a review of polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions, as well as other advanced algebraic topics. The second trimester is a study of trigonometry. The third trimester covers linear systems, series and sequences, and an introduction to the Calculus itself. This course enables students to move on to the AP Calculus BC course. Prerequisite: B or better in Honors Algebra II and Trig or permission of instructor. Honors. 6 credits

Calculus: This course is designed to give students a strong foundation in the following topics: limits, derivatives, anti-derivatives, integrals and differentials. While much of what is covered in the course parallels the content of AP Calculus AB, the course itself is not bound by the same pace and rigor inherent to the Advanced Placement program. The course is appropriate for students who would benefit from additional review of pre-calculus concepts woven into the course and/or students who want to study calculus but do not want the intensity of an AP course. Students in Calculus will review the following concepts: algebra and functions, mathematical modeling with elementary functions, rates of change, inverse functions, logarithms and exponential functions, trigonometry, and modeling with trigonometry. These concepts will be reviewed in the context of calculus concepts such as the derivative, differential equations, graphical interpretations of the derivative, zeroes of functions, optimization, related rates, anti-differentiation, initial value problems, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Upon completion of this course, students will be prepared to enroll in AP Calculus AB (or BC with departmental approval) or, in the case of graduating seniors, an appropriate college level calculus course. Prerequisite: C average in Hon Pre-Calc. or an A or B average in Pre-calc. 6 credits

AP Calculus AB (Calculus I): This course is equivalent to a first semester college calculus course, covering differential and integral calculus. Students will study limits of functions, continuity, derivatives and applications of the derivative. As part of integral calculus, students will examine the definite integral as a limit of Riemann sums, the area under a curve, solving differential equations, and various applications to economics, biological, and physical situations. Students are required to take the AB Advanced Placement exam in May. Prerequisite: B or better in Pre-Calc. AP. 6 credits

AP Calculus BC (Calculus I & Calculus II): This course is a full year calculus course that includes all of the topics covered in AP Calculus AB plus topics typically covered in a Calculus II course at the college level. Technology will be an important part of the class to reinforce work and to interpret results of various experiments and data. This course is faster paced than the AB course and students should be prepared to attend occasional class sessions outside of the regularly scheduled times. Students are required to take the BC AP exam in May. Prerequisite: B or better in Hon. Pre-Calc. AP. 6 credits AP

Statistics: The Advanced Placement course in Statistics is equivalent to a one-semester introductory, non-calculus-based, college course in statistics. The AP Statistics course covers four broad themes which include: exploring data, planning a study, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference. Students who have successfully completed Algebra II / Trigonometry and who possess sufficient mathematical maturity are eligible for this course. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement exam in May. Prerequisite: B or better in Algebra II and Trigonometry. AP. 6 credits

Financial Mathematics: This yearlong course will use a mixture of arithmetic and algebraic skills to tackle the major concepts involved in the modern world of business and finance. The main topics to be covered include simple & compound interest, consumer credit, and various investment tools, such as annuities and Treasury Bills. Basic business applications will also be included in the course, such as markup, markdown, and inventory methods. While some sophisticated mathematics will be used in this course, (from algebra, pre-calculus, probability & statistics, calculus, and geometry) students need only to have completed a second year course in algebra to be ready for the material here. Lastly, economic concepts will be introduced and studied concurrently for the purpose of applying newfound mathematical skills, as deemed appropriate by the instructor. These concepts include supply & demand, marginal cost, stock market, and FOREX trading. Students should come out of this course with the knowledge of how to use mathematics to make informed decisions as they earn, spend, and save money throughout the rest of their lives. Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra II & Trigonometry. 6 credits

Multivariable Calculus: This yearlong course is similar to a third semester study of calculus at the collegiate level and is a continuation of the topics typically studied in Calculus I and II. While calculus up until this point has focused on the study of scalar-valued functions of one variable, multivariable calculus considers multiple inputs and vector-valued outputs and thus students will learn to analyze functions in a multidimensional setting. Familiar topics such as graphing, differentiation, and integration will be extended as students learn about vector algebra and geometry in space, vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, partial derivatives and chain rules, Lagrange multipliers, multiple integration, iterated integrals, and change of variables. Students may exercise the option to take this course for three college credits in “Advanced Calculus” through Delaware Valley University. Registration and tuition payment of $300 to Del Val will occur during the fall term for interested students. Prerequisite: AP Calculus BC or AP Calculus AB (with approval of Math Department Chair). 6 credits


WINTER TRIMESTER COURSE

Architecture and Design: This course is designed to give students an in-depth analysis of architecture and how to develop a building from the ground up. All architecture will be explored through an engineering and artistic point of view. The main points of interest include: skyscrapers, bridges, and design elements. We will also explore natural forces such as wind and earthquake issues as well as environmentally friendly options. This class will incorporate creative explorations which will end with a portfolio. This class fulfills a global studies program credit. Global. 2 credits

Science

The Science curriculum at Solebury School provides students with diverse and challenging opportunities to explore the world of Science. Our Upper School required courses of Conceptual Physics, taken in the 9th or 10th grade, and Biology, taken in the 11th grade, teach students to think like scientists. In these classes, students develop their critical thinking skills through analysis, problem-solving, observation and experimentation. In addition, these courses give students a basic understanding of our physical universe, and of human beings as physical, biological and psychological beings, so that they can make informed decisions about society and themselves.

As with many of the programs at Solebury, the Science curriculum allows students to follow their own individual interests as they choose courses beyond the graduation requirements. It also allows for flexibility within the core sequence of classes. For students interested in a rigorous academic track, our Honors Science sequence takes a “Physics First” approach in which students take Honors Conceptual Physics, Honors Chemistry and Honors Biology. During the General level sequence, students will take Conceptual Physics in the 9th grade, but for those needing more math support in their freshman year, we have Chemistry in the Community as an option. This is a conceptual chemistry class, with minimal math demands, designed for 9th graders. Those taking Chemcom as 9th graders will take Conceptual Physics in the 10th grade, followed by General Biology. Most students taking Conceptual Physics in the 9th grade will take General Chemistry in the 10th grade, followed by General Biology in grade 11. However, it is possible to take Chemcom in the 10th grade for those wanting or needing a less demanding chemistry class. Elective options include AP Chemistry, Honors Environmental Science, Anatomy and Physiology and various trimester electives that change regularly in order to provide Solebury students with an incredibly diverse choice of classes. Past elective courses have included Forensic Science, Medical Ethics, Climatology, Genetics, Zoology, Physiology of Exercise and Nutrition, Field Natural History, Microbiology and Astronomy.

The Middle School Science curriculum is based on the idea that students moving towards their Upper School careers need to develop the skills to think like scientists. 7th and 8th grade classes help students build these skills through the development of basic skills and plenty of hands-on experimentation. A variety of activities are done to explore the world around us and give students a deeper understanding of our environment. ICC Physical Science will be offered this year.

If you have any questions about Solebury School’s Science Department, please contact department chair Cari Nelson at cnelson@solebury.org or 215.862.5261.


YEARLONG COURSES

ICC Physical Science: This is a hands-on, inquiry-based course. We begin the year learning about space and the stars above us, move into metric conversions, scientific method, and conservation of matter. Then, we end the year with solubility, and atomic theory. Students will perform experiments, gather data and draw conclusions based on their evidence. Throughout the year we will touch on topics that are interwoven into their ICC History and ICC English class. The emphasis throughout the year will be on learning through experimentation. Required; Physical Science is intended for 7th and 8th graders. 6 credits

Chemistry in the Community: “ChemComm” is a conceptual course that introduces students to the foundational topics and basic mathematical concepts of chemistry. It is structured around community and environmental issues related to chemistry, putting chemistry into the context of students’ everyday lives. Students will gain skills in scientific inquiry, problem solving, and laboratory techniques, setting them up for success not only in future chemistry courses but also for any future science course they may take. ChemComm is intended for 9th and 10th graders. 6 credits

Conceptual Physics: Conceptual Physics is a hands-on introduction to the basic concepts of matter and energy requiring no more than elementary algebra familiar to ninth graders. It will emphasize experiments and group work. Students are also introduced to the fundamentals involved in writing lab reports. Required. Conceptual Physics is intended for 9th and 10th graders. 6 credits

Honors Physics 9: Honors Physics is an honors-level physics course designed for the 9th or 10th grade student who excels in math and wishes to better understand the world around them. This class will cover more material than Conceptual Physics; including gravity, heat, optics, nuclear physics, and an introduction to electromagnetism. Laboratory experiments and group activities/discussions are an intrinsic component of the class. Prerequisite: Must have completed Honors Algebra 1 with a B+ or higher and either completed Honors Geometry or take it concurrently. Honors Physics is intended for 9th and 10th graders. Honors. 6 credits

General Chemistry: Chemistry engages students with topics concerning matter and how matter changes. During the fall term we discuss the scientific method, chemistry’s historical significance, atomic theory, the arrangement of the Periodic Table of Elements, and chemical nomenclature. In the winter term, we focus on chemical reactions and their representation in chemical equations. We develop the tools, such as stoichiometry, to analyze and understand chemical reactions both qualitatively and quantitatively, and practice these skills in the laboratory. Finally in the spring term, we study thermodynamics; modern atomic theory; the behavior of solids, liquids and gases; nuclear energy; and when time allows we introduce biochemistry in preparation for Biology. A traditional lecture format is used in this class, with supplemental demonstrations, group work, lab experiments and discussions when appropriate. Throughout the course problem-solving skills are emphasized and fostered along with writing lab reports. Prerequisites: Conceptual Physics and Algebra I. Chemistry is intended for 10th graders. 6 credits

Honors Chemistry: This is the honors version of the general chemistry class (above) and is designed for students who have an interest in exploring chemistry in more detail than the general chemistry class will cover. It is intended for students who plan to take science courses in college. In addition to the topics listed for regular chemistry, this class will explore such areas as chemical equilibrium, kinetics, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and an introduction to more specific branches of chemistry, such as organic chemistry, biochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. There are more demands in this course compared to the general chemistry class and this class will move at a rapid pace. There are labs throughout the year where students engage with and apply the concepts. Prerequisites: honors physics or departmental recommendation or permission of instructor. This course may be taken concurrently with Algebra II & Trig with permission of instructor. Honors chemistry is intended for 10th graders. Honors. 6 credits

AP Chemistry: This course is meant to be taken as a second year of chemistry after taking honors chemistry. It is equivalent to a college level general chemistry course which provides rigorous study in four major areas: atoms and elements, structure and properties of matter, chemical reactions and reaction rates, and descriptive chemistry. Students must be highly motivated to independently complete reading and review problems outside of class in order to maintain the rigorous pace of the AP schedule. Class will focus on modern examples of chemical applications and multiple trips are planned to enhance the learning process. Students will demonstrate a basic understanding of, and ability to apply mathematical solutions to classic questions in descriptive and analytical chemistry. At the end of the year, students will take the 27 Advanced Placement Exam for college credit. Prerequisites: Honors Chemistry or permission of the instructor. AP. This course is intended for 11th and 12th graders. 6 credits

General Biology: Biology is a laboratory science course that covers the study of living things and allows students to explore a variety of concepts. Biology focuses on the study of life by examining the fundamental concepts of cellular biology, genetics, ecology, evolution and classification. The scientific process and laboratory skills are emphasized along with biology’s connection to other scientific disciplines. Topics that are covered include biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, evolution, classification of organisms and ecology. In addition, students learn scientific writing skills and improve their skills in lab experiments. Required. Biology is intended for 11th graders. 6 credits

Honors Biology: Honors Biology is a laboratory-based course that is designed to familiarize the student with the major concepts of biological science, scientific inquiry, interdependence of organisms, the cell, matter, energy, organization of living systems, molecular basis of heredity, and biological evolution. This course provides numerous opportunities for students to develop science laboratory skills, critical thinking, and an appreciation for the nature of science through inquiry-based learning experiences. Investigative, hands-on activities that address the variety of topics associated with high school biology are an integral part of this course. Honors Biology is designed for the highly motivated student with a strong interest in the field of science. Prerequisites: Honors Chemistry or departmental recommendation. Honors. Biology is intended for 11th graders. 6 credits

Honors Environmental Science: An introduction to interrelationships among the natural environment, humans, and the human environment, including the biological, social, economic, technological, and political aspects of current environmental challenges. This course focuses on building the scientific framework necessary to understand environmental issues. It explores the structure, function, and dynamics of ecosystems, interactions between living and physical systems, and how human enterprise affects natural systems. It also examines current issues regarding human impacts on environmental quality, including global warming, air and water pollution, agriculture, overpopulation, energy, and urbanization. This class fulfills a global studies program credit. Prerequisites: Honors Chemistry, Honors Biology or departmental recommendation. Global, Honors. 6 credits

Human Anatomy and Physiology: This course will concentrate on the Anatomy and Physiology of the human organism. Topics will include basic anatomical directional terms and taking an in-depth look at each system. Throughout the year, several dissections of organs will be performed and an end of the year dissection of a fetal pig. In addition, there will be one field trip to the Mutter Museum of the College of Physicians and Pharmacy. There is a heavy emphasis upon vocabulary in this course and rote information will be assigned to students with the expectation that they will learn much of it on their own. Grades will be determined by a series of tests, quizzes, and lab work. There are also two non-fiction books that we will be reading throughout the year called Complications, and Sick Girl. Prerequisites: C+ or better in Biology or taken concurrently with Biology. Anatomy and Physiology is intended for 11th and 12th graders. 6 credits

Robotics: This year long class will apply STEM principles and basic programming fundamentals to create engineered solutions to meet design requirements specified for engineering demonstrations and participation in outside engineering competitions. This is a year-long elective class in order to accommodate multiple design iterations and continuous design improvements. The fall trimester will emphasize programming fundamentals using the PYTHON programming language and arduino, while the Winter and Spring trimesters will focus on the design, build, and testing of robotic assemblies. Occasional field trips and Saturday morning required event participation (approximately once per trimester, for competitions only) are a core component of this class. The intention of this course is to minimize outside 28 of class “homework” through in class project participation. Prerequisite: Engineering I and II, or permission of the instructor. 6 credits


FALL TRIMESTER COURSES

Moral Conflicts: Throughout the trimester we will explore challenging moral issues around the globe that have a strong hold in the scientific community. There will be a mix of reading assignments, debates, research projects, and presentations. Some topics that will be covered include the death penalty, eugenics, and physician assisted suicide. This class is co-taught with a history teacher and a science teacher, and fulfills a global studies program credit. Global. This course is intended for 11th and 12th graders. 2 credits

Engineering I: Introduction to Engineering: This class is designed to be an educational and entertaining single trimester introduction to applied STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) concepts. Group and project based learning will be emphasized in this course with curriculum designed to introduce students to basic engineering design concepts and project management fundamentals necessary to plan and build a project while adhering to an anticipated schedule. Modern skills and technology used to assemble basic projects will be introduced with a focus on design using computers and access to the school’s 3D printer and makerspace materials. The technical aspects of coding and computer programming are not emphasized in this course, although students with a more technical background are welcome to contribute additional levels of engineered complexity to their group projects. Introduction to Engineering is intended for 9th and 10th graders. 2 credits

Science of Movement and Exercise: This trimester course will concentrate on the movement of the human body during physical activity. You will have the opportunity to learn the basics of biomechanics, kinesiology, and exercise science. Topics will include anatomical direction, kinematics and kinetics, identifying forces on the body (acceleration, momentum, speed, power, energy), analyzing sport skills and identifying proper movement patterns, biomechanics of strength training, and different types of energy systems used while exercising. This course is intended to be hands on with a lot of movement. We will be going to the weight room frequently and will some days exercise to understand the concepts we are learning. There is a heavy emphasis upon vocabulary in this course and it will be assigned to students with the expectation that they will learn much of it on their own. Grades will be determined by a series of tests, quizzes, homework, and lab work. Prerequisite: Biology or concurrent with Biology. This course is intended for 11th and 12th grade students. 2 credits

Health: This course provides an opportunity for students to learn about human sexuality, nutrition, drug use and abuse, lifestyle choices, sexually transmitted diseases, environmental health issues, birth control and other topics surrounding a person's physical and psychological well-being. This course fulfills the Health graduation requirement and is intended for students in 9th, 10th, or 11th grade. 1 credit


WINTER TRIMESTER COURSES

Introduction to the Arts: Middle School Robotics. This class is designed to be an educational and entertaining single trimester introduction to Robotics and applied STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) concepts. We will utilize a variety of resources including Lego Mindstorms EV3 robotics kits to design basic robotic and mechanical systems while we explore the concepts of logic and design that make our systems complete their expected tasks. This class does not require extensive computer skills as a prerequisite. Group and project based learning will be emphasized. Prerequisite: None. Introduction to Robotics is intended for 7th and 8th graders. 1 credit

Microbiology: Students will be exposed to identification of microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, parasites, fungi, etc.) using microscopes and basic microbiology lab techniques. We will explore the beneficial and harmful effects that microorganisms have in our world today. There will be labs incorporated into class time. Class will include lecture, lab, research, and projects. This course is intended for 10th, 11th and 12th graders. 2 credits

Science of Movement and Exercise: This trimester course will concentrate on the movement of the human body during physical activity. You will have the opportunity to learn the basics of biomechanics, kinesiology, and exercise science. Topics will include anatomical direction, kinematics and kinetics, identifying forces on the body (acceleration, momentum, speed, power, energy), analyzing sport skills and identifying proper movement patterns, biomechanics of strength training, and different types of energy systems used while exercising. This course is intended to be hands on with a lot of movement. We will be going to the weight room frequently and will some days exercise to understand the concepts we are learning. There is a heavy emphasis upon vocabulary in this course and it will be assigned to students with the expectation that they will learn much of it on their own. Grades will be determined by a series of tests, quizzes, homework, and lab work. Prerequisite: Biology or concurrent with Biology. This course is intended for 11th and 12th grade students. 2 credits

Health: This course provides an opportunity for students to learn about human sexuality, nutrition, drug use and abuse, lifestyle choices, sexually transmitted diseases, environmental health issues, birth control and other topics surrounding a person's physical and psychological well-being. This course fulfills the Health graduation requirement and is intended for students in 9th, 10th, or 11th grade. 1 credit


SPRING TRIMESTER COURSES

Astronomy: The Solar System: Exploring Our Cosmic Neighborhood: "The Solar System" is an elective science course. The foundation for the course will be the history of astronomy, and the evolution of mankind’s understanding of the stars and planets. Students will begin the trimester investigating the Earth-Moon system, followed by "The Solar System," and finally moving on to stars and galaxies. While this course will offer merely a glimpse of all that there is to learn in the field of astronomy, students should leave the course with the skills and knowledge needed to pursue their interest further if they choose. In addition to the topics covered in this course, students will learn how to use telescopes and other observational techniques. Students will be expected to participate in several evenings of observations on campus, and will be expected to attend at least one field trip to an astronomy-based site off-campus. A basic understanding of physics, and both geometry and trigonometry, is useful for students who wish to take this course. Prerequisite: Biology or taking Biology concurrently. This course is intended for 11th and 12th grade students. 2 credits

Introduction to Engineering II: Applied Engineering Principles: This class will work with the applied STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) concepts from the Engineering I class and use them to demonstrate programmable systems, with emphasis on design and programming of robotic systems. The emphasis of the class will be on group projects incorporating technology to include arduino, introductory level circuit kits, and LEGO robotics systems. Prior experience with coding and computer programming are not a prerequisite, although students with computer science backgrounds will be able to enhance their understanding through projects with varied levels of complexity. Prerequisite: Engineering I. 2 credits

Forensics: This course is intended to be an opportunity for students to apply various aspects of previous science classes to the collection and interpretation of physical evidence. The lectures and in-class labs will include a variety of methods of crime scene investigation including glass fracture analysis, blood spatter analysis, DNA fingerprinting, toxicology, entomology, hair and fiber analysis, fingerprint analysis and other relevant methods of evidence collection. Case studies will also be used to gain a greater appreciation for how forensic investigation is used in the solving of crimes. Course work includes lectures, hands-on lab activities, research papers, and presentations. This course is intended for 10th, 11th, and 12th graders. 2 credits

Health: This course provides an opportunity for students to learn about human sexuality, nutrition, drug use and abuse, lifestyle choices, sexually transmitted diseases, environmental health issues, birth control and other topics surrounding a person's physical and psychological well-being. This course fulfills the Health graduation requirement and is intended for students in 9th, 10th, or 11th grade. 1 credit

Social Studies

Every person needs a sound education in history and the study of society, so our Social Studies courses aim to appeal to and challenge every type of learner. The History Department offers a purposeful sequence of core courses from the 7th through the 12th grades that focuses on the following: an understanding of the cultural, economic, political, and intellectual history of the West and non-West; an understanding of US history; an understanding of US government; and an investigation of ethics. We supplement these core offerings with a broad array of electives taught by members of the department and by part-time instructors who teach in an area of their expertise.

We collaborate with students in an inquiry into past and present societies, and we want students to find this inquiry relevant to their own lives. Our classes are organized around seminar style discussions that teach students how to listen to a broad range of ideas, how to advocate their own positions, and how to engage collegially with students and teachers. In this format, students are not passive receptors of lectures; rather, teachers guide students in a group exploration of contending ideas. In this group exploration, we find that a mix of learners is useful, so students who are geared towards math or science or art have much to offer the group.

For those students who want to pursue study at the highest level in high school and college, our program provides excellent opportunities for advanced work through Honors and AP courses in both our core and elective offerings.

The history department is most concerned that students demonstrate competency in the various courses we offer. “Competency” in this context means developing a knowledge base, but at least as important is the way students critically think about the content. Toward this end, our courses focus on teaching the following:

  • Critical thinking: We teach students to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate a variety of information sources — and to recognize motive and bias.
  • An appreciation of perspective: Students are challenged to analyze historical and social issues from diverse perspectives, such as those perspectives shaped by race, gender, class, and culture. Students are also expected to interrogate how their own perspective influences their understanding of the world.
  • Research method: Our program builds research skills that are age appropriate, and our graduates are prepared for the research expectations of their college courses.
  • An exposure to technology: Our students frequently use a range of (ever changing) learning and communication technologies.
  • Public speaking: Many informal and low stakes opportunities are provided for students to practice public speaking, and such opportunities help students succeed in formal public speaking situations.
  • Writing: Our courses tend to be writing intensive; we teach various types of writing (from essay to research writing), and we push students to write clearly and cogently.
  • Communication and assessment: We want students to learn a variety of ways to communicate what they’ve learned, and we use a variety of methods to assess their understanding of material, 32 including the following: in-class discussion; public speaking and various types of presentations; group projects; research writing; essay writing; various types of tests and quizzes; debate; journal writing; interviews; postings on web interfaces; and various types of audio-visual productions.

Twelve credits in Social Studies are required. Six credits must be in United States History. The remaining six credits may come from any other full-year course or combination of trimester courses. Virtually every student completes at least 18 credits (3 full years), and many take more than 24 credits (4 full years).


YEARLONG COURSES

ICC History 7/8: The goal of the ICC History class is to encourage students to think critically about increasingly complex material in a fun and creative environment. We look at the key questions raised in the ICC program through historical and literary lenses (the English and History dovetail and offer complementary content). ICC History focuses on expository and research writing and there is an emphasis on critical reading to understand perspective and bias. The students also begin learning the process of research in order to answer the questions of history and provide sufficient evidence when making claims. In conjunction with the work students encounter in English, students learn to listen, think, question, and express their opinions confidently about a variety of issues. ICC History is intended for 7th and 8th graders. 6 credits

World History 9: How We Got to Now: From the deep past to today, people have been forced to solve certain social problems, such as: food production and storage; protection against aggressors; provision of shelter from the elements; and the creation and maintenance of social, ideological, and spiritual orders. In meeting these challenges, people’s responses depended, to varying degrees, on their environments and cultures (and sometimes luck!). They developed different civilizations over time, and, as those civilizations became more sophisticated, they began to interact more with other civilizations – through trade, war, conquest, technological and cultural borrowing, etc. In World History 9, we begin with the principal cultural hearths, as it were, and trace world history through time, from the cradles of civilization to the forces, conflicts, and co-operations that have led to the emergence of global interdependence in the modern era. In this course, students will learn to think openly and critically about what they read, to identify and express empathy with different historical perspectives, to mount a historical argument, and to develop a deeper understanding of themselves and their place in the world. Global. Recommended for ninth grade. 6 credits

Ethics 10 and Honors Ethics 10: We are all endowed with the power to lead ourselves, to support our families, and to engage meaningfully in our social and political worlds. This fact is particularly relevant to sophomores, who stand on the threshold of forging a path in the upper school and beyond. In order for students to make positive contributions to all of their present and future communities, it is essential that they appreciate the ethical weight of their lives. Our intention is not to provide answers; rather, we encourage students to engage in deliberate inquiry and reflection—often the precursor to healthy decision making—that we hope becomes a lifelong habit. In creating this seminar style class, instructors draw content from world history, philosophy, and the social sciences; we introduce students to deep study in these fields and we hope to inspire further study in all of them. We believe that students benefit enormously from study in Ethics, so we designed this full year course to be taken by all sophomores; as such, it reinforces the habits of thought introduced in the 9th grade World History course and prepares students for the advanced work that they will undertake in their junior and senior years. Global. Recommended for tenth grade. 6 credits

United States History: This course examines the social, economic, political, and cultural forces that have influenced the development of the United States. Particular attention is paid to historiographical questions about objectivity, reliability of evidence and sources, and the selection and interpretation of data. A further aim of the course is to build students' skills in research, argumentation, debate, and the presentation of information. Required for juniors, unless in Am Studies or ESL US History. 6 credits

American Studies (AP US History): This two-period course combines Honors American Literature with AP US History. By focusing on the social and political connections between the literature and the history, we integrate the two disciplines. An in-depth study of American history and literature, the course works to correct common misconceptions. Besides reading the major American writers (Irving, Cooper, Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Whitman, Dickinson, Sandburg, Frost, and Ginsberg, to name a few), we read first-person accounts by Native Americans, African-Americans, and Europeans of first encounters, colonial life, and more recent history. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Examination in U.S. History given in May. Enrollment is limited. This course includes a mandatory summer reading requirement. Prerequisite: B or better in 10th grade English and History. AP. 6 credits in History and 6 credits in English

Honors Government: This full-year course, which meets at the same time as AP Government and Politics, is designed to equip students with a rich and nuanced understanding of public policy formation in the United States. Students will dig deep into the structures of government, examining how institutions, such as interest groups and the media, function within today’s political ecosystem. In order to build competency in "reading between the lines" of political current events, students will gain a working understanding of "framing" and message-management, use knowledge of fallacies and bias in order to deconstruct "talking points," and practice recognizing access and influence. Prerequisite: completion of a mandatory summer research assignment and a B+ or better in previous History class. Honors. AP test optional. 6 credits

AP Government and Politics: This course, which meets at the same time as Honors Government, gives students a comprehensive overview of all corners of the American political system. Students examine the constitutional underpinnings of our system, the official branches of government, and the "linkage institutions," such as political parties and interest groups, that connect the people to policy-makers. In addition to the material covered in Honors Government, students will be responsible for familiarizing themselves with topics such as federalism, selective incorporation, and budgetary procedure. Students are required to take the Advance Placement exam in May. Prerequisites: completion of intensive summer assignment, a B+ or better in 11th grade history, and a demonstrated capacity for independent work. AP. 6 credits

Character Leadership and Development: This research-based curriculum is designed to improve the character and leadership traits among high school students. Examples of Character and Leadership serves as the textbook for the curriculum. We believe students need positive role models to look up to and emulate. Unfortunately, many students today report they do not have role models. Other times, the role model is, at best, a curious choice. The Role Models textbook highlights 18 individuals who exemplify the different character traits covered in the curriculum. Each of the 18 character and leadership traits have been paired with weekly topics and role models who are worthy of study. Although we tackle a different topic each week, the format of the class remains the same. This format utilizes ethical dilemmas, lectures, character movies, core readings from the role models textbook, basic skills, leadership principles, current events, local community leaders & weekly writing assignments to provide a framework for consistent and stable learning. This is an elective course that students may choose to take for one, two or all three terms. Since the material is not cumulative, students may enter or leave any term. 2 credits each term


FALL TRIMESTER COURSES

Cultural Anthropology: This course presents a comparative study of cultures and human societies and allows an opportunity to understand human diversity throughout the world. Students will explore how various peoples use socially learned traditions, religion, politics, kinship, language, gender roles, and much more to structure their lives. Throughout the class students will broaden their understanding of different cultures and will learn new analytical tools to better understand cultural difference, contemporary global change, and social organization. Students will be asked to demonstrate their understanding of the material through class participation, guided fieldwork projects, and individual and group assignments. This class fulfills a global studies program credit. Global. 2 credits

Gender & Society: The purpose of this class is to prompt students to acknowledge and review their preconceptions regarding what it means to “be a woman” and “be a man” in our society through exposing them to short stories and the novel Herland by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, as well as articles, nonfiction books (Reviving Ophelia and Raising Cain), and videos, including “Killing Me Softly”, “Dreamworlds” and “Tough Guise”. These resources are used in order to challenge and develop students’ perceptions of the objectification of women and the crisis in masculinity in the media and society as a whole. Students are evaluated: on the quality and quantity of their participation in class discussions; on their written assignments, including journal writing; on their individual and group presentations; and on their final visual essay/presentation. 2 credits

Honors Economics: Theory & Reality: The purpose of this class is for students to examine traditional economic theory and to compare that theory against real world outcomes. As they grapple with the material, students are encouraged to develop their critical awareness and deepen their understanding of the meaning of a “successful economy” from a variety of perspectives. The overt and covert, subtle and direct influence that the media wields in the economic decision making process is examined in depth. Particular attention will be paid to the issues of: the nature and extent of our freedom of choice; equity, efficiency and environment; and the interrelationship between the market and democracy. Students are evaluated in the following ways: on the quality and quantity of their participation in group and class discussions; on journal writing; on their individual and group presentations; and on a final extensive reflective essay and/or multiple intelligence project. Honors. 2 credits

Moral Conflicts: Throughout the trimester we will explore challenging moral issues around the globe that have a strong hold in the scientific community. There will be a mix of reading assignments, debates, research projects, and presentations. Some topics that will be covered include the death penalty, eugenics, and physician assisted suicide. This class is co-taught with a history teacher and a science teacher, and fulfills a global studies program credit. Global. This course is intended for 11th and 12th graders. 2 credits

Search for Enlightenment: World Religions in the Postmodern Era: Through materials drawn from anthropology, history, literature, and science, students in this course examine religious and spiritual practice around the world in order to explore the human search for meaning and the impact of globalization on that search. In addition to examining the well-known texts of “major religions”, we will read works by authors such as Jack Kerouac, Elaine Pagels, Basho, Black Elk, Karen King, John Muir, Che Guevara, and others. While one of the goals of this course is to survey non-Western and Western spiritual practices, we will also seek to understand the way spiritual philosophies and practices have travelled and have been altered in the contemporary era. Through journaling, creative writing, discussion, and research, students reflect upon this material and engage in open-minded discovery. This class may also be taken for English credit. Global. 2 credits

Teach2Serve: Developing Capstone: Students planning to continue for a second year of Teach2Serve will need to complete a summer internship or volunteer experience and write up a project proposal in the fall. In the winter trimester, students will begin meeting twice a week as a cohort and one-on-one with an instructor to conceive, plan, develop and implement a capstone project, which is a proposed solution to a social or environmental problem identified by the student. Students start by listening to those in the affected community, educating themselves, educating others, and defining their goals. They will develop and practice an elevator pitch so they can succinctly communicate what they hope to accomplish with their project. Next, they will write a vision and mission statement; a project proposal in which they identify their goals, assets, logistics, marketing plan, recruiting plan, and governance; a preliminary budget; a fundraising proposal; and a self-evaluation. The focus of this student-directed program is on learning by doing. Open to students accepted from the Teach2Serve program only. 2 credits

Healthy Relationships: Mental health and healthy human sexuality begin with healthy relationships, and healthy relationships begin with communication. This course begins with the assumption that access to the information necessary to develop healthy intimate relationships and make informed decisions about one’s body is a basic human right. The goal of this class is to provide students with accurate information, but also to help them respect and advocate for themselves while at the same time listening to and respecting others, whether peers, partners, or parents. In this trimester class, students will be provided with information about human sexuality, gender identities, sexually transmitted infections, birth control, and reproductive systems, but in discussions and activities, they will also be encouraged to communicate their own values and preferences. This course fulfills the Health graduation requirement and is intended for students in 10th, 11th, or 12th grade. 1 credit


WINTER TRIMESTER COURSES

Creative Nonfiction: Some of the most powerful, thoughtful, and culturally significant writing is found in the essays of writers like Joan Didion, David Foster Wallace, and others who are published under the genre “creative nonfiction.” To engage with this historical, observational, and experimental writing form, students will read and analyze essays, produce original content, and give meaningful feedback to one another. The habits and skills developed in this course are useful for those interested in journalism, cultural studies, and creative writing. This class may also be taken for English credit. 2 credits.

Honors Thesis: This class will provide students with the experience of researching and writing an extended paper. The topic chosen can be anything from history, the social sciences, or the humanities, and should be a topic with which the student is already familiar. Students will be supported through the process of choosing a topic, researching, development of a thesis, writing, and the final oral interview. Honors. 2 credits

Linguistic Anthropology: This course will introduce students to linguistic anthropology, which investigates the relationship between language and culture. Students will examine how language is shaped by everyday social and cultural traditions, how people utilize language in their daily lives, and how language informs identity. In addition to studying language diversity within cultural contexts, this class will explore the intersections between language and social categories like race, class, nationality, ethnicity, and gender. Integral to the course will be questioning assumed beliefs about language and appreciating linguistic diversity. Students will use anthropological research methods to investigate the linguistic trends they encounter everyday. Class participation, independent research projects, individual and group assignments, and regular readings will be used to evaluate progress. This class fulfills a global studies program credit. Global. 2 credits

Psychology: Theoretical Roots: The purpose of this class is for students to acquire the knowledge and skills to develop an understanding of themselves and the world around them through an examination of various schools of thought of some famous psychologists including Freud, Jung, Skinner, and Erikson. In addition, students will be introduced to a selection of psychological topics centered on the following: personality; relationship with self, others, and the world; mental health; and the development of an intense self-reflective awareness. Students are evaluated in the following ways: on the quality and quantity of their participation in group and class discussions; on journal writing; on their individual and group presentations; and on a final extensive reflective essay and/or multiple intelligence project. 2 credits

Teach2Serve: Developing Capstone: Students planning to continue for a second year of Teach2Serve will need to complete a summer internship or volunteer experience and write up a project proposal in the fall. In the winter trimester, students will begin meeting twice a week as a cohort and one-on-one with an instructor to conceive, plan, develop and implement a capstone project, which is a proposed solution to a social or environmental problem identified by the student. Students start by listening to those in the affected community, educating themselves, educating others, and defining their goals. They will develop and practice an elevator pitch so they can succinctly communicate what they hope to accomplish with their project. Next, they will write a vision and mission statement; a project proposal in which they identify their goals, assets, logistics, marketing plan, recruiting plan, and governance; a preliminary budget; a fundraising proposal; and a self-evaluation. The focus of this student-directed program is on learning by doing. Open to students accepted into the Teach2Serve program only. 2 credits

Teach2Serve: Giving: In this two trimester honors course, which is a requirement of the Teach2Serve program, students will study the history of philanthropy and social service in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors and identify the motivations, strengths and limitations of each. Students will become familiar with the actors in the process, the barriers that exist, the points of entry, and the pathways to change. Along the way, they will develop such skills as teambuilding, listening, conflict resolution, negotiation, resource mobilization, and fundraising. Lessons will be communicated more concretely through an examination of articles, books, and case studies related to an area of need chosen by the class. This course will also include workshops and opportunities to meet with dynamic social entrepreneurs and professionals working in the non-profit world. Course requirements include readings, journal responses, group projects and presentations, and a grant proposal. Open to students in the Teach2Serve program only. 4 credits. Winter and Spring trimesters

Healthy Relationships: Mental health and healthy human sexuality begin with healthy relationships, and healthy relationships begin with communication. This course begins with the assumption that access to the information necessary to develop healthy intimate relationships and make informed decisions about one’s body is a basic human right. The goal of this class is to provide students with accurate information, but also to help them respect and advocate for themselves while at the same time listening to and respecting others, whether peers, partners, or parents. In this trimester class, students will be provided with information about human sexuality, gender identities, sexually transmitted infections, birth control, and reproductive systems, but in discussions and activities, they will also be encouraged to communicate their own values and preferences. This course fulfills the Health graduation requirement and is intended for students in 10th, 11th, or 12th grade. 1 credit


SPRING TRIMESTER COURSES

Archaeology: Archaeology is the study of past cultures through their material remains. In this course, students will examine how the field of archaeology helps us to better understand the past using mostly unwritten sources and how it shapes the modern world around us. Class topics will include excavation methods, dating techniques, artifact analysis, conservation, and cultural history. This course will also include opportunities to visit an archaeological site and meet professionals working in the field. Students will be evaluated through class participation and discussion, presentations, readings, and writing assignments. This class fulfills a global studies program credit. Global. 2 credits

Existential Philosophy: The purpose of this class is to: 1) introduce students to a selection of existentialist philosophers including: Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, Kafka, Heidegger, Sartre, and Camus; 2) analyze selected philosophical concepts including “freedom”, “authenticity”, “anxiety”, “finitude”, “The Absurd”, and “Super-Consciousness”; 3) encourage students to use the knowledge, skills and understanding acquired in the class to initiate the development of a personal life philosophy. Students are evaluated on the quality and quantity of their participation in group and class discussions; on journal writing; on their individual and group presentations; and on a final extensive reflective essay and/or multiple intelligence project. 2 credits

Honors Debate: Debate is a dynamic, entertaining, and challenging form of public speaking. To promote its practice, this course will help students explore argument theory, review techniques of public speaking, and give students the opportunity to participate in structured class debates in the style of parliamentary debate. Students will further develop critical thinking and writing skills by reviewing editorial articles and by describing, analyzing, and critiquing methods of persuasion. This class may also be taken for English credit. Honors. 2 credits

Honors Social Theory: This course is designed to introduce students to an influential body of ideas that has helped shape the study of society over the past century. Through primary and secondary texts, students will survey significant thinkers in fields such as psychology, sociology, culture studies, and history, and they will be introduced to the contest of viewpoints within these fields. Students will be asked to show their understanding of ideas in class discussions, in presentations, and in essays that look at a topic (chosen by the student) from the point of view of the theory covered in class. Honors. 2 credits

Identity and Diversity: The purpose of this team taught class is to prompt students to acknowledge, review and develop their preconceptions regarding the terms “identity” and “diversity” as they apply to themselves and others in our society. Students will be exposed to literature, non-fiction material, and audio/visual resources relating to identity and diversity, and they will engage in discussion and dialogue to assist in their reflective process. Students are evaluated in the following ways: on the quality and quantity of their participation in class discussions; on their written assignments, including journal writing; and on their individual and group presentations. 2 credits

Teach2Serve: Giving: In this two trimester honors course, which is a requirement of the Teach2Serve program, students will study the history of philanthropy and social service in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors and identify the motivations, strengths and limitations of each. Students will become familiar with the actors in the process, the barriers that exist, the points of entry, and the pathways to change. Along the way, they will develop such skills as teambuilding, listening, conflict resolution, negotiation, resource mobilization, and fundraising. Lessons will be communicated more concretely through an examination of articles, books, and case studies related to an area of need chosen by the class. This course will also include workshops and opportunities to meet with dynamic social entrepreneurs and professionals working in the non-profit world. Course requirements include readings, journal responses, group projects and presentations, and a grant proposal. Open to students in the Teach2Serve program only. 4 credits. Winter and Spring trimesters

Teach2Serve: Capstone Project: (spring trimester, year 2) The focus of this class is on helping students complete their capstone project proposals and in many cases, helping them implement their plans. By the end of the class, students are expected to submit a finished mission and vision statement, a project proposal, an informational article and/or presentation about their project, a budget, and in most cases, to have implemented a fundraising initiative. Student may also be asked to present their capstone project idea at an assembly or TEDx event in the spring. Whether they launch their projects or not, we hope that students will graduate from this class with a clearer idea of how to become a social entrepreneur or work to affect positive change in their communities. Open to students accepted into the Teach2Serve program only. 2 credits.

Healthy Relationships: Mental health and healthy human sexuality begin with healthy relationships, and healthy relationships begin with communication. This course begins with the assumption that access to the information necessary to develop healthy intimate relationships and make informed decisions about one’s body is a basic human right. The goal of this class is to provide students with accurate information, but also to help them respect and advocate for themselves while at the same time listening to and respecting others, whether peers, partners, or parents. In this trimester class, students will be provided with information about human sexuality, gender identities, sexually transmitted infections, birth control, and reproductive systems, but in discussions and activities, they will also be encouraged to communicate their own values and preferences. This course fulfills the Health graduation requirement and is intended for students in 10th, 11th, or 12th grade. 1 credit

Visual and Performing Arts

Art should challenge the intellectual, creative, and expressive powers of each student. The Arts program teaches a variety of creative skills to develop self-esteem through the successful completion and exhibition or performance of works of art. Six Art credits are required for graduation. Studio Art, Chorus, and Theatre courses earn one credit each trimester. Art History courses earn two credits each trimester. Unless otherwise noted, courses can be repeated for credit. Please note that there will be a $25 fee per trimester for all visual arts courses, to cover materials

Private Music Lessons: As a service to students, the music department can arrange for outside music teachers to come to Solebury School to provide private lessons to students. These lessons are at the students’ expense and are scheduled during the students’ free periods and after school. At the moment, we offer lessons in guitar, bass guitar, string bass, flute, violin, piano, viola, saxophone, and drums. We can also provide names of music teachers.

If you have any questions about Solebury School’s Arts Department, please contact department chair Erika Bonner at ebonner@solebury.org or 215.862.5261


YEARLONG COURSES

Advanced Ceramics: This class is for students who are very serious about continuing in ceramics. The projects are similar to the assignments in the Ceramics class but the expectations are higher. Students are expected to push themselves harder and focus more on the development of their personal vision. Advanced students will continue to develop their hand-building skills through increasingly complex projects and will continue to develop creative concepts through working in series. Students will begin (or continue) throwing on the wheel. In addition, they will have the opportunity to work with different clay bodies (types of clay), and have their work fired in a wood-fired kiln and experience a Raku firing. Students are expected to participate in all aspects of the running of the Ceramic Studio. This is a yearlong course and cannot be taken on a trimester basis. Studio Materials Fee of $75. Prerequisite: Intermediate Ceramics. 3 credits

Advanced Painting and Drawing: This class is open to more experienced students of painting and drawing. The students will continue to refine basic drawing techniques, such as contour, positive and negative space, composition, and value while working with more complex subjects. They will work with tempera, watercolor, gouache, and acrylic paint on both subjects from life and from their imagination. The class also will introduce oil painting. The students will work toward developing a more personal style and sense of creative expression and will be expected to participate in group critique. This is a yearlong course and cannot be taken on a trimester basis. Studio Materials Fee of $75. Prerequisite: Intermediate Painting and Drawing (taken twice) or permission of the instructor. 3 credits

Advanced Photography: Advanced Photo is a yearlong photography film and digital photography course. Students will build on their film photography skills from intro and intermediate and begin shooting digitally. Students will develop the skills to handle a complex workflow of inputting, editing with Photoshop, outputting, and filing digital images. They will also develop a vocabulary that will enable them to critique and analyze their work and the work of their fellow students in a group. Additionally, they will evaluate and incorporate the technical, aesthetic, and critical aspects of photography into their own work both visually and verbally. Students will be charged a lab and camera rental fee. Prerequisites: Intermediate Photography with a B+ or better. 3 credits

AP Studio Art: For students planning to go to Art School, or for those for whom it’s even a possibility, this course is a must. Students will develop their portfolios initially through teacher directed assignments and then through student-derived projects. This challenging course is designed with all of the expectations of a college level course and is open to qualified juniors and seniors only. In order to meet the minimum of six hours of studio time, this course will meet during one Arts block, one class in the rotating schedule, and Monday evening Life Drawing. It is expected that at least 50% of the students’ work will be done outside of class, so independent initiative is a must to be successful in the class. There are two options for the AP Studio Art Portfolio: Drawing or 2-D Design. Early in the year, the Art Department will meet with students or parents to discuss the differences between the two. Because there are two portfolio options, students may take AP Studio Art twice; however they may not repeat the same portfolio category. Portfolios will be submitted in May and although we hope our students achieve high marks for their portfolios, we are more concerned with their personal development as artists. In order to be accepted into this competitive and rigorous course, students must a) submit an application/contract and a sample of their work for review, and b) successfully complete all of the summer assignments and submit them within the first week of school. AP. 9 credits. Prerequisite: Advanced Painting and Drawing. There is a $300 fee for materials for this course.

Digital Filmmaking, Script to Screen: In this yearlong course, students will write, produce, and edit short films. This course will provide hands-on experience in production planning, writing, and acting for the camera, as well as lighting, digital cinematography, audio recording, and non-linear editing. The class will meet twice a week during an Arts block; however due to the nature of the assignments some time outside of regular class will be necessary. This course will emphasize the development of skills to use creative thinking for problem solving. A willingness to work as part of a team is a prerequisite, as all projects will be accomplished in groups. 3 credits

Master Singers: Within the larger chorus there is a select group of 12-16 students called the Master Singers. Participation in the Masters Singers is by invitation or audition only and it requires a full year commitment from the students. The Master Singers will attend all regularly scheduled Chorus rehearsals/classes, in addition to the Master Singers’ rehearsals. The Master Singers will have additional opportunities to perform and must audition for Bucks County Music Educators Chorus. The Master Singers must be available to perform for graduation. Prerequisite: Advanced musicians by invitation and audition. 6 credits

Screenplay Writing: If you love to write and watch movies then this is a good fit for you. Learn how to organize your ideas into scenes and express that vision on the page to help create motion pictures. Discover how to describe lighting, character development, settings and notes to crew. Analyze scenes from award winning and modern/indie films and other pop video scripts to see the reality of screenplay writing. 6 credits

The Solebury Elite Ensemble: As the title suggests, this is an ensemble designed for the musical student who plays at a very advanced level. Students are admitted by audition or at the discretion of the music director. Though preference will be given to those who are well grounded in the classical style and who can fluently read music notation, students will have the opportunity to study a mix of musical styles with all of their particular characteristics. Each student plays a role in choosing the ensemble's repertoire. Performances throughout the school year will include, but not be limited to, a school assembly, a school auction, the end of trimester concert and other off campus venues to be determined. Grading is based very simply on participation and attendance which includes both rehearsals and performances. Prerequisite: Advanced musicians by invitation and audition. 3 credits


FALL TRIMESTER COURSES

Visual Arts

Please note that there will be a $25 fee per trimester (unless a different fee is stated within course description) for all visual arts courses, to cover materials.

Advanced Printmaking: This course is open to anyone who has taken the Printmaking course. We have found that just when things start to click in printmaking, the ideas start flowing and we are realizing the potential of the medium… the trimester ends. Often was heard in the studio “I don’t want to stop printing!” Advanced printmaking is a two-trimester course. Students will hone their skills with the techniques they learned in Printmaking and will be introduced to new techniques. The students will focus on developing a body of work, and research a printmaker. We will be visiting Printmaking studios in Philadelphia or New Jersey and meet with master printmakers. Students will be expected to participate in group and individual critiques, submit 8 finished prints and complete self-assessments. Prerequisite: Printmaking. 2 credits studio fee $50

Art Foundations: This course introduces beginning students to the basics of painting and drawing with a focus on the Elements of Design. Students will learn to work in pencil, charcoal, gouache, pastel, acrylic, and oil paint. They will start with learning how to draw basic shapes, progress to learning how to use light and shadow to create space and form, and learn how to create engaging compositions. These concepts and techniques will be taught through the lens of the 2 dimensional design elements of line, shape, size, space, color, texture, and value. The class is intended to prepare students for the Intermediate class and is a prerequisite to that class. No Prerequisite, 1 credit

Art History: Renaissance: Many students will be familiar with this Art History course because many of the great masters of European art are household names, or at least Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. As we enter the Renaissance period in Europe, new ideas and concerns affect the arts. Humanism appears as a driving influence of the Renaissance, as the Renaissance develops simultaneously in several places over Europe. The Renaissance of the 15th century could be organized by geography, but the Renaissance of the 16th century becomes more complex. The Reformation alters Europe physically and religiously, by the end of the Renaissance Europe is divided into religious camps, which exist to this day. The extremely decorative style of Mannerism (High Renaissance) gives way to a new style that is influenced by Naturalism and seeks drama, (but you will have to take Baroque Art History to find out what happens next) Many would argue that the modern world begins in the Renaissance because of the sudden acceleration of change. Students will have object identification tests, vocabulary/terms quizzes, and daily in class object presentations. If time and schedules allow, we will take a museum trip. .. This class fulfills a global studies program credit and.may be taken for Social Studies credit and without regard to sequence. Global. 2 credits

Digital Design, Text, Print, & Web: This class will explore a range of layout and design styles throughout history, and show the differences and similarities between print and web publications. Some amount of time will be devoted to typography and a “best of” from Johannes Gutenberg to the present, showing changes in public preference in the look of type in print and advertising. The students will design and build an “advertising campaign” for the Solebury art department, both in print and on the web, using student and faculty art as content. ADOBE INDESIGN, PHOTOSHOP, ILLUSTRATOR 1 credit

Intermediate Painting & Drawing: This course builds on the techniques and concepts of the foundations class. Students will work in pencil, charcoal. gouache, pastel, acrylic, and oil. This class is designed to help the student build upon their painting and drawing skills through work that is more advanced. Students will work mainly from observation on specific skills such as rendering light and shadow, creating engaging compositions, and will begin to explore how to bring their own creative voice 42 to their work. Students must take two Intermediate level classes to be admitted to the Advanced class. Prerequisite: Art Foundations (or Intro to Painting & Drawing). 1 credit

Intermediate Ceramics: This class is for students who would like to continue working in ceramics, but are not interested in the intensive year long course. Ceramics students will continue to develop their handbuilding skills through increasingly complex projects. They will begin to develop creative concepts through working in series. Students will begin throwing on the wheel. In addition, they may have the opportunity to work with different clay bodies (types of clay), and have their work fired in alternative kilns. Students are expected to participate in all aspects of the running of the Ceramic Studio. Prerequisite: Intro to Ceramics.1 credit

Introduction to Ceramics: Students in this introductory course will explore two basic hand-building techniques: pinching (as in pinch pots) and coil construction. With these two techniques, an artist can create almost any object that can be imagined. Each skill helps to develop muscle memory and an understanding of the properties of the clay. Timing plays a big part in ceramic work; consequently, students will learn how to plan and prepare for every project. No prerequisite 1 credit.

Introductory Photography: This is an introductory black & white photography class with emphasis on learning the mechanics of a manual exposure camera and the shooting, processing, and printing of black & white negative film. No Prerequisite, 1 credit.

Life Drawing: This class meets on Monday from 7-9 PM and is an advanced class for mature students who wish to work on their portfolio and/or deepen their skills of working from observation. Students must have a working knowledge of contour, gesture, value, and composition, and experience working from life to accurately see form in space and translate it to the two dimensional page. Students will have the opportunity to use the human form as their subject as they advance their drawing skills. This class will broaden the students’ repertoire of drawing materials, including pencil, charcoal, conte, pastel, ink, and tempera paint as they explore the creative possibility of using the materials alone and in mixed media pieces. The students will work to develop a personal style and to learn to speak knowledgeably about the work in class critique. The fall trimester class will emphasize traditional skills and drawing techniques with an emphasis on portfolio completion for seniors and beginning preparation for juniors. The winter term will move into more work with color and longer poses. In the spring trimester juniors will be encouraged to continue building their portfolios. In the spring, the work will become more experimental and involve more mixed media. Prerequisite: Intermediate Painting and Drawing (taken twice) and permission of Art Department. 1 credit , studio fee $60

Lighting for Digital Photography: Students will explore various techniques and applications of Studio Photography. The course will include an introduction to lighting for Studio Portraiture and how to photograph 2 and 3 dimensional objects. Additionally, students will also explore setting up portable wireless lighting equipment as well as shooting pictures in naturally and artificially lit conditions. Students will shoot on digital cameras and begin to edit their images with Photoshop. Prerequisite: Intermediate Photography. 1 credit.

Patent Process: In this class, we will write a sample patent of the student's invention. In the process, we will provide the required illustrative drawings with numbers and references and a descriptive write-up designed to guide an attorney in creating a list of claims for a patentable invention. We will discuss operation of the patent office and its procedures and the flow of the application process. Searches will be discussed so as to establish what is patentable and aspects of filing rights with the Patent Cooperation Treaty [PCT]. Differences will be clarified about types of patents and coverage issues. Various historic patents will be discussed with an emphasis on "claims" and claim structure. Attorney costs and filing and post issue fees will be reviewed. We may visit a patent attorney for professional appraisal of the student work. 1 credit

Printmaking: Printmaking is all about working with the printing process, particularly with monotype, masking, chine-collé and block print. Students are given a few techniques to work with in the beginning of class; as they print, they learn how to apply the inks, how to hand-print, how to use the press, and how to mix the inks to achieve the effects they desire. The students also learn how to layer colors to develop depth in their work. Once students have a fairly good grasp of the basics, they are given more techniques that they are then expected to experiment with and incorporate into what they have already learned. Students will be expected to participate in group and individual critiques, submit 10 finished prints and complete self-assessments. Students may repeat this course, there is no prerequisite. 1 credit

Video Editing: This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of nonlinear video editing. The student will gain an understanding of video formats and concepts of video and audio compression used in recording, editing, and for final display. Cutting techniques will be explored including concepts of continuity, frame matching, using varying angles effectively, editing multi camera footage, techniques to avoid jump cuts and the use of parallel action. An introduction to sound editing will include fundamentals of mixing for film, Foley effects and processing audio to enhance the audience experience. Students will use the following software in this course: Adobe Premiere Pro, Adobe After Effects, Adobe Audition, Adobe Photo Shop and Adobe Media Encoder. 1 credit

Performing Arts

A Capella: This ensemble class covers the basics of singing without instrumental accompaniment across different musical styles, i. e. Classical, African Folk, Doo-wop, Spirituals, Pop and more. Students learn the joy of building vocal harmonies while maintaining the rhythmic dance that characterizes a given style. Students are involved in choosing the songs learned. Class meeting times are coordinated with Chorus to accommodate those who wish to participate in both groups. Grading is based on attendance, participation and a final concert. Prerequisite: It's a class designed for experienced singers, and preference is given to those who have completed at least one year of Chorus. Others are admitted by audition. 1 credit

Acting: In this course, students will develop their skills as actors, exploring historical movements in theater and creating their own performance style. Students will learn how to interpret and portray characters, working both individually and in groups to create high-quality artistic products. This course will focus on: Comparing and contrasting various theater movements and traditions from around with world as well as gaining an understanding of the origins of theater. Students will perform scenes based on various world and historical theater traditions. They will also work on developing monologues, both writing and performing an original work for the class. We will delve a bit into Shakespeare and work on interpreting the modern American play. 1 credit

Ballet I: This beginning ballet class is for the student who would like to learn the basics of ballet and how it relates to other dance types. Students will work on technique and become familiar with dance terminology. It would also be an appropriate course for students who are beginning pointe technique. It is a performance based class and students will be performing at the fall concert. Studies will involve presentations on ballet performers and their influence on the world of dance.1 credit

Chorus: Chorus is a performance class using group and harmony singing in a variety of styles. Rehearsals will also include physical exercises to enhance and improve vocal skills, breathing, coordination, and rhythmic skills. The musical selections will be prepared for performances at recitals and assemblies. Performing experiences will be enriched with additional kinds of musical understanding; including, but not limited to music theory, listening and history. Self and group assessments will be used for reflection and grading. Please note that in addition to all regularly scheduled weekday rehearsals there will be some mandatory weekend and/or evening rehearsals. The general chorus is expected to attend the 44 first hour and a half of these rehearsals unless prior notice is given to the director. Dress rehearsals are mandatory for all performers. No Prerequisite, 1 credit

Diversity Music Ensemble: From Bach to Cold Play to African and Chinese Folk, this ensemble class is designed to celebrate musical diversity across different styles, eras and cultures. String players of bowed and plucked instruments, vocalists, keyboardists, percussionists and wind players are all welcomed. Also in the spirit of musical diversity, we often collaborate with students of other ensembles or other select musicians at Solebury. Students learn the art of building a strong musical team, being rhythmically in sync, and playing the supportive role as well as the solo with in a group. At the end of each trimester students perform in concert with Chorus and Dance. Grading is based very simply on class attendance, participation, and a final concert. Enrollment preference for this ensemble is given to accomplished players and vocalists who read music notation. Others may be admitted at the director's discretion. 1 credit

Greatest Bands of All Time: This is a fun, in-depth look into the most influential bands to ever hit the airwaves. Who were they, and what makes them the "greatest"! Here are some criteria that must be met: they were the innovators and creators of a new style, sound, and brought a fresh approach to the rock and popular music genre, and finally, they influenced those who came after. We look at who were the first, who might it be now, and why. From Buddy Holly and The Crickets, The Beatles to Sly and The Family Stone to Nirvana, let the debates begin! Learn what made them tick musically, and why they matter. No prior music knowledge is needed for this class, just an appreciation and interest in music. No Prerequisite, 1 credit

Intro to Theater Tech: In this Theater Tech Boot Camp you will develop the skills to become a backstage superstar! Throughout the trimester, you will learn about theater safety, stage management, props, construction and painting techniques, as well as lighting, sound and scenic design. While learning the ins and outs of technical theater through hands-on experience, you will be given a chance to earn Sole-certifications that will allow you to move into our after school Theater Tech Program as well as our SoleStage-Theater Tech class. 1 credit

Jazz Roots Ensemble: This ensemble plays everything from mainstream jazz to be-bop and funk. It is a performance based group, and gives feature concerts. This class offers lots of improvisational opportunities. Learn improvisational techniques, and how to build a solo. Jazz Roots also encourages original composition. Learn how pieces can be arranged to create a more interesting composition, and how to rehearse a band. Vocalists and instrumentalists are welcome. Prior music training is needed for this class. Prerequisite: Instrumental Proficiency or better, students must have approval of instructor. 1 credit

Musical Theatre Dance: Come and study Broadway choreographers as you learn original steps to some of Broadway's best known songs. It's a perfect class for someone considering a career in theatre. Each year the dances change so the class can be taken more than once. 1 credit

Rock Band: Rock Band plays contemporary and classic rock. Come get the experience of what it feels like to be in a band. Learn about rehearsing a band, and how to make an exciting arrangement for a band. Get into stage presence and performance skills. Rock Band is a performance based group, and gives feature concerts. Vocalists and instrumentalists are welcome. Prior music playing is expected for this class. Prerequisite: Instrumental Proficiency. 1 credit

SoleStage - Theater Tech: This class is designed to give you the experience of apprenticing in a real working scene shop. Lessons and projects will be designed in conjunction with our Main Stage production each trimester and will give you hands-on experience working on a show--from design to 45 completion. Each trimester will consist of different challenges and new projects allowing you to hone your craft while creating spectacular scenic elements that can be added to your technical theater portfolio. Students enrolled in this class will also have priority placement in our after school Theater Tech Program. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Intro to Theater Tech. 1 credit


WINTER TRIMESTER COURSES

Visual Arts

Please note that there will be a $25 fee per trimester (unless a different fee is stated within course description) for all visual arts courses, to cover materials.

Advanced Printmaking: This course is open to anyone who has taken the Printmaking course. We have found that just when things start to click in printmaking, the ideas start flowing and we are realizing the potential of the medium… the trimester ends. Often was heard in the studio “I don’t want to stop printing!” Advanced printmaking is a two-trimester course. Students will hone their skills with the techniques they learned in Printmaking and will be introduced to new techniques. The students will focus on developing a body of work, and research a printmaker. We will be visiting Printmaking studios in Philadelphia and New Jersey and meet with master printmakers. Students will be expected to participate in group and individual critiques and complete self-assessments. Advanced printmakers may also take Printmaking again, if they wish to print all year. Prerequisite: Printmaking. 2 credits

Art History: Baroque and 18th Century: The extremely decorative style of Mannerism (High Renaissance) gives way to a new style that is influenced by Naturalism and seeks drama, the Baroque. As with many styles, the reaction to the stout Baroque, is the highly decorative Rococo. By the 18th century, we will hop the pond and focus on the artistic works influencing and developing in the United States. Students will have object identification tests, vocabulary/terms quizzes, and daily in class object presentations. If time and schedules allow we will take a museum trip. This class fulfills a global studies program credit and may be taken for Social Studies credit and without regard to sequence. Global. 2 credits

Collage and Mixed Media: Collage is an art form that uses a wide variety of found materials combined in a single piece of artwork. In this class students will bring together pieces from magazines, natural objects, advertising, and many other sources to create original works of art. The class will also use paint and other traditional materials to go with the collage elements. This class is a wonderful opportunity for students to explore their creativity through a class where they don't have to be "good at art." No prerequisite 1 credit.

Computer Aided Drawing (AutoCAD): CAD drafting is the language that architects, planners, and other designers use to communicate with one another on collaborative projects and with builders or fabrication shops. The process allows the viewing of the idea you've had in a scaled relationship, to check that the rooms, moving parts, etc. will fit together and function properly. The drafting process aids in graphic thinking and suggests new avenues of design exploration. No Prerequisite, 1 credit.

Digital Design: Illustration, Manipulation & Animation: This class will develop students digital art skill-set by viewing the computer as a tool for augmenting handmade (pen & and ink / pencil drawing, charcoal, watercolor, photography, videography) artwork. Digital manipulation of student & faculty artwork will be the vehicle for teaching the various specialized functions and specific uses of each software package. Some amount of time will be spent stressing how the human element and things like inconsistent lines / brush strokes, small mistakes, and imperfections in medium can subconsciously differentiate our perception of digital art from “warm and real” to “cold and sterile.” The students would 46 each conceptualize and complete a 30 second animation about art & technology for display on our website and blog. ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR, PHOTOSHOP, AFTER EFFECTS. 1 credit

Digital Documentary Photography: In this class, students will focus on the making of moment-based, storytelling visuals. Using their expanding photographic knowledge from prior photography courses the students will be introduced to long-form still-image documentary work on various social and political issues. As they begin to discuss and analyze this work they will photograph a series of projects where their images will work together to tell a story. Prerequisites: Intermediate Photography, and Digital Photo or Lighting (or permission of instructor). 1 credit

Intermediate Ceramics: This class is for students who would like to continue working in ceramics, but are not interested in the intensive year long course. Ceramics students will continue to develop their handbuilding skills through increasingly complex projects. They will begin to develop creative concepts through working in series. Students will begin throwing on the wheel. In addition, they may have the opportunity to work with different clay bodies (types of clay), and have their work fired in alternative kilns. Students are expected to participate in all aspects of the running of the Ceramic Studio. Prerequisite: Intro to Ceramics.1 credit

Intermediate Painting & Drawing: This course builds on the techniques and concepts of the foundations class. Students will work in pencil, charcoal. gouache, pastel, acrylic, and oil. This class is designed to help the student build upon their painting and drawing skills through work that is more advanced. Students will work mainly from observation on specific skills such as rendering light and shadow, creating engaging compositions, and will begin to explore how to bring their own creative voice to their work. Students must take two Intermediate level classes to be admitted to the Advanced class. Prerequisite: Art Foundations (or Intro to Painting & Drawing). 1 Credit

Introduction to Ceramics: Students in this introductory course will explore two basic hand-building techniques: pinching (as in pinch pots) and coil construction. With these two techniques, an artist can create almost any object that can be imagined. Each skill helps to develop muscle memory and an understanding of the properties of the clay. Timing plays a big part in ceramic work; consequently, students will learn how to plan and prepare for every project. No prerequisite 1 credit.

Introductory Photography: This is an introductory black & white photography class with emphasis on learning the mechanics of a manual exposure camera and the shooting, processing, and printing of black & white negative film. No Prerequisite, 1 credit.

Intermediate Photography: In this class, students continue using and refining the shooting, processing, and printing skills learned in Introductory Photography with more emphasis on composition, the effects of aperture and shutter speed, and obtaining good tonal range in the final print. Students’ photographic vocabulary will expand as they are introduced to new terms and techniques. Students may repeat this course. Prerequisites: Introductory Photo, 1 credit.

Life Drawing: This class meets on Monday from 7-9 PM and is an advanced class for mature students who wish to work on their portfolio and/or deepen their skills of working from observation. Students must have a working knowledge of contour, gesture, value, and composition, and experience working from life to accurately see form in space and translate it to the two dimensional page. Students will have the opportunity to use the human form as their subject as they advance their drawing skills. This class will broaden the students’ repertoire of drawing materials, including pencil, charcoal, conte, pastel, ink, and tempera paint as they explore the creative possibility of using the materials alone and in mixed media pieces. The students will work to develop a personal style and to learn to speak knowledgeably about the work in class critique. The fall trimester class will emphasize traditional skills and drawing techniques 47 with an emphasis on portfolio completion for seniors and beginning preparation for juniors. The winter term will move into more work with color and longer poses. In the spring trimester juniors will be encouraged to continue building their portfolios. In the spring, the work will become more experimental and involve more mixed media. Prerequisite: Intermediate Painting and Drawing (taken twice) and permission of Art Department. 1 credit, studio fee $60

Printmaking: Printmaking is all about working with the printing process, particularly with monotype, masking, chine-collé and block print. Students are given a few techniques to work with in the beginning of class; as they print, they learn how to apply the inks, how to hand-print, how to use the press, and how to mix the inks to achieve the effects they desire. The students also learn how to layer colors to develop depth in their work. Once students have a fairly good grasp of the basics, they are given more techniques that they are then expected to experiment with and incorporate into what they have already learned. Students will be expected to participate in group and individual critiques, submit 10 finished prints and complete self-assessments. Students may repeat this course, there is no prerequisite. 1 credit

Video Editing: This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of nonlinear video editing. The student will gain an understanding of video formats and concepts of video and audio compression used in recording, editing, and for final display. Cutting techniques will be explored including concepts of continuity, frame matching, using varying angles effectively, editing multi camera footage, techniques to avoid jump cuts and the use of parallel action. An introduction to sound editing will include fundamentals of mixing for film, Foley effects and processing audio to enhance the audience experience. Students will use the following software in this course: Adobe Premiere Pro, Adobe Aftereffects, Adobe Audition, Adobe Photo Shop and Adobe Media Encoder. 1 credit

Performing Arts

Ballet II: This course is a continuation of Ballet I. Students will continue to improve technical applications with emphasis on turns and jumps. There will be opportunities to share their own choreography with the class. This is a performance based class and students will be performing at the winter concert. 1 credit

The Black American Singer in You-- a study of culture and heritage: For many decades, American singers of African heritage have been emulated around the world as pioneers of Blues, Jazz, Rock, R&B, Rap, etc. As singers they have repeatedly modeled something distinctly soulful, expressive and rhythmic that just seems to tap into our common humanity. Through a musical lens, "The Black American Singer in You" is really a class about the ancestors who live in each of us.. It's a class about Black history as it is deeply rooted and even synonymous with American history. It's also a class about the history of all the people who migrated to the Americas and of course those who were already here. Who were your ancestors pre-USA? Class activities will include but not be limited to: songs, culture share, shared storytelling, discussions, documentaries, games, etc. Grading is based on full participation and a final project. No Prerequisite. 1 credit

Chorus: Chorus is a performance class using group and harmony singing in a variety of styles. Rehearsals will also include physical exercises to enhance and improve vocal skills, breathing, coordination, and rhythmic skills. The musical selections will be prepared for performances at recitals and assemblies. Performing experiences will be enriched with additional kinds of musical understanding; including, but not limited to music theory, listening and history. Self and group assessments will be used for reflection and grading. Please note that in addition to all regularly scheduled weekday rehearsals there will be some mandatory weekend and/or evening rehearsals. The general chorus is expected to attend the first hour and a half of these rehearsals unless prior notice is given to the director. Dress rehearsals are mandatory for all performers. No Prerequisite, 1 credit

Directing For the Stage: This rigorous academic class is for serious drama students. The objective is to develop a student who is well-versed in dramatic theory, script analysis, and theatrical design. Students will analyze theatrical trends, innovators, theorists, and artists, providing a foundation for their interdependent direction of two major projects. Specific topics include: Choosing a script, developing a concept, casting, and staging, working with actors and design & technical choices. After completing the course, seniors are eligible to direct for the school’s annual Spring Festival of One Acts Plays. No Prerequisite, 1 credit

Diversity Music Ensemble: From Bach to Cold Play to African and Chinese Folk, this ensemble class is designed to celebrate musical diversity across different styles, eras and cultures. String players of bowed and plucked instruments, vocalists, keyboardists, percussionists and wind players are all welcomed. Also in the spirit of musical diversity, we often collaborate with students of other ensembles or other select musicians at Solebury. Students learn the art of building a strong musical team, being rhythmically in sync, and playing the supportive role as well as the solo with in a group. At the end of each trimester students perform in concert with Chorus and Dance. Grading is based very simply on class attendance, participation, and a final concert. Enrollment preference for this ensemble is given to accomplished players and vocalists who read music notation. Others may be admitted at the director's discretion. 1 credit

Jazz Roots Ensemble: This ensemble plays everything from mainstream jazz to be-bop and funk. It is a performance based group, and gives feature concerts. This class offers lots of improvisational opportunities. Learn improvisational techniques, and how to build a solo. Jazz Roots also encourages original composition. Learn how pieces can be arranged to create a more interesting composition, and how to rehearse a band. Vocalists and instrumentalists are welcome. Prior music training is needed for this class. Please note this is a two trimester course. Prerequisite: Instrumental Proficiency or better, students must have approval of instructor. 2 Credits

Rock Band: Rock Band plays contemporary and classic rock. Come get the experience of what it feels like to be in a band. Learn about rehearsing a band, and how to make an exciting arrangement for a band. Get into stage presence and performance skills. Rock Band is a performance based group, and gives feature concerts. Vocalists and instrumentalists are welcome. Prior music playing is expected for this class. Prerequisite: Instrumental Proficiency. 1 credit

Scoring for Video/Film: In this course the student will explore and learn about writing music for video and film. We will learn about the use of music to express visual and emotional imagery. We will use and become familiar with pro-tools software, and its use in writing and recording. There will be pro tools workstations in the class. Scoring class will collaborate with the video production class, and score a commercial and video. This class is ideal for all musicians and/or students who have an interest in electronic music. Please note this course is two trimesters, Winter/Spring. 2 credits

SoleStage - Theater Tech: This class is designed to give you the experience of apprenticing in a real working scene shop. Lessons and projects will be designed in conjunction with our Main Stage production each trimester and will give you hands-on experience working on a show--from design to completion. Each trimester will consist of different challenges and new projects allowing you to hone your craft while creating spectacular scenic elements that can be added to your technical theater portfolio. Students enrolled in this class will also have priority placement in our after school Theater Tech Program. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Intro to Theater Tech. 1 credit

Swing Dance: Come on you hip cats. You know you want to join the group as we learn partner dancing from the 1920's, 30's and 40's. A partner is not required. You will be matched up in class. 1 Credit


SPRING TRIMESTER COURSES

Visual Arts

Please note that there will be a $25 fee per trimester (unless a different fee is stated within course description) for all visual arts courses, to cover materials.

Art Foundations: This course introduces beginning students to the basics of painting and drawing with a focus on the Elements of Design. Students will learn to work in pencil, charcoal, gouache, pastel, acrylic, and oil paint. They will start with learning how to draw basic shapes, progress to learning how to use light and shadow to create space and form, and learn how to create engaging compositions. These concepts and techniques will be taught through the lens of the 2 dimensional design elements of line, shape, size, space, color, texture, and value. The class is intended to prepare students for the Intermediate class and is a prerequisite to that class. No Prerequisite, 1 credit

Art History: 19th Century, Modernism and Avant-Garde: There is no other way to describe this course but Wow! If you thought things changed fast during the Renaissance, the pace for change accelerates exponentially as we enter the 19th and 20th Centuries. We have the developments of modern science and industrialization. America fully assumes a role in the art world. There are more “–isms” than you can shake a stick at. Artists are looking forward and looking back, there are movements and counter movements: it is a tremendously exciting time. Although this class covers a mountain of information, students will feel very comfortable as most of the art will be very familiar. Some of the many artists we will study are: David, Delacroix, Goya, Turner, Rousseau, Millet, Manet, Renoir, Picasso, Mondrian, Moore, O’Keeffe, Calder, Warhol, and so many more you will be surprised how many you will recognize. Students will have object identification tests, vocabulary/terms quizzes, and daily in class object presentations. If time and schedules allow we will take a museum trip. .. This class fulfills a global studies program credit and.may be taken for Social Studies credit and without regard to sequence. Global. 2 credits

Digital Documentary Photography: In this class, students will focus on the making of moment-based, storytelling visuals. Using their expanding photographic knowledge from prior photography courses the students will be introduced to long-form still-image documentary work on various social and political issues. As they begin to discuss and analyze this work they will photograph a series of projects where their images will work together to tell a story. Prerequisites: Intermediate Photography, and Digital Photo or Lighting (or permission of instructor). 1 credit

Intermediate Ceramics: This class is for students who would like to continue working in ceramics, but are not interested in the intensive year long course. Ceramics students will continue to develop their handbuilding skills through increasingly complex projects. They will begin to develop creative concepts through working in series. Students will begin throwing on the wheel. In addition, they may have the opportunity to work with different clay bodies (types of clay), and have their work fired in alternative kilns. Students are expected to participate in all aspects of the running of the Ceramic Studio. Prerequisite: Intro to Ceramics.1 credit

Intermediate Painting & Drawing: This course builds on the techniques and concepts of the foundations class. Students will work in pencil, charcoal. gouache, pastel, acrylic, and oil. This class is designed to help the student build upon their painting and drawing skills through work that is more advanced. Students will work mainly from observation on specific skills such as rendering light and shadow, creating engaging compositions, and will begin to explore how to bring their own creative voice to their work. Students must take two Intermediate level classes to be admitted to the Advanced class. Prerequisite: Art Foundations (or Intro to Painting & Drawing). 1 Credit

Intermediate Photography: In this class, students continue using and refining the shooting, processing, and printing skills learned in Introductory Photography with more emphasis on composition, the effects of aperture and shutter speed, and obtaining good tonal range in the final print. Students’ photographic vocabulary will expand as they are introduced to new terms and techniques. Students may repeat this course. Prerequisites: Introductory Photo, 1 credit.

Life Drawing: This class meets on Monday from 7-9 PM and is an advanced class for mature students who wish to work on their portfolio and/or deepen their skills of working from observation. Students must have a working knowledge of contour, gesture, value, and composition, and experience working from life to accurately see form in space and translate it to the two dimensional page. Students will have the opportunity to use the human form as their subject as they advance their drawing skills. This class will broaden the students’ repertoire of drawing materials, including pencil, charcoal, conte, pastel, ink, and tempera paint as they explore the creative possibility of using the materials alone and in mixed media pieces. The students will work to develop a personal style and to learn to speak knowledgeably about the work in class critique. The fall trimester class will emphasize traditional skills and drawing techniques with an emphasis on portfolio completion for seniors and beginning preparation for juniors. The winter term will move into more work with color and longer poses. In the spring trimester juniors will be encouraged to continue building their portfolios. In the spring, the work will become more experimental and involve more mixed media. Prerequisite: Intermediate Painting and Drawing (taken twice) and permission of Art Department. 1 credit , studio fee $60

Silk Screening: Silk Screening is a printing method in which a stencil is applied to a screen that is stretched over a frame. Ink is applied to the screen and then pressed through the screen onto the surface being printed. Once a screen is created the printing process is fairly quick and multiple images can be created in a short amount of time; making screen printing an ideal technique for creating posters, t-shirts and commercial art. Screen printing has been used extensively and creatively in the production of propaganda. We will be experimenting with three primary screen preparations, photo emulsion, drawing fluid with screen filler and an adhesive mask. Students will design and print propaganda posters, design their own t-shirts and complete a four color print. Students will be provided t-shirts for printing; however they may wish to bring in additional clothing. No prerequisite, 1 credit, studio fee $50

Tile and Mosaic Design: Bucks County is rich with Arts and Crafts tradition; Doylestown is home to the Moravian Pottery and Tile Works. In this class students will explore stamp, cuenca, and brocade tile designs, mosaic design using both tessera and stained glass techniques. We will explore decorative techniques for surface treatment, using glazes, underglazes, slips and textures. Students will be able to add their designs to the mosaic stairwell when we learn about setting and grouting tiles. We will take a trip to the Moravian Pottery and Tile Works and Fonthill Museum. No Prerequisite, 1 credit

Video Editing: This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of nonlinear video editing. The student will gain an understanding of video formats and concepts of video and audio compression used in recording, editing, and for final display. Cutting techniques will be explored including concepts of continuity, frame matching, using varying angles effectively, editing multi camera footage, techniques to avoid jump cuts and the use of parallel action. An introduction to sound editing will include fundamentals of mixing for film, Foley effects and processing audio to enhance the audience experience. Students will use the following software in this course: Adobe Premiere Pro, Adobe Aftereffects, Adobe Audition, Adobe Photo Shop and Adobe Media Encoder. 1 credit

Performing Arts

Acoustics: This course introduces the basic science of sound and the technology behind reproducing it. We start with the behavior of sound in air, the mechanism of the ear, and some psychoacoustics, audio masking, reflections, and the Haas effect. Next we’ll investigate a smattering of architectural acoustics, including sound in interior and exterior spaces. We’ll also discuss natural sound producers (i.e. strings, reeds, and vibrating air in columns). Electronic means of reproduction follows: microphone types and mechanisms, preamplifiers, dynamic range control, frequency contouring, anti-feedback methods and directional loudspeakers. Topics will be illustrated with an oscilloscope and audio spectrum analyzer. 1 credit

Chorus: Chorus is a performance class using group and harmony singing in a variety of styles. Rehearsals will also include physical exercises to enhance and improve vocal skills, breathing, coordination, and rhythmic skills. The musical selections will be prepared for performances at recitals and assemblies. Performing experiences will be enriched with additional kinds of musical understanding; including, but not limited to music theory, listening and history. Self and group assessments will be used for reflection and grading. Please note that in addition to all regularly scheduled weekday rehearsals there will be some mandatory weekend and/or evening rehearsals. The general chorus is expected to attend the first hour and a half of these rehearsals unless prior notice is given to the director. Dress rehearsals are mandatory for all performers. No Prerequisite, 1 credit

Diversity Music Ensemble: From Bach to Cold Play to African and Chinese Folk, this ensemble class is designed to celebrate musical diversity across different styles, eras and cultures. String players of bowed and plucked instruments, vocalists, keyboardists, percussionists and wind players are all welcomed. Also in the spirit of musical diversity, we often collaborate with students of other ensembles or other select musicians at Solebury. Students learn the art of building a strong musical team, being rhythmically in sync, and playing the supportive role as well as the solo with in a group. At the end of each trimester students perform in concert with Chorus and Dance. Grading is based very simply on class attendance, participation, and a final concert. Enrollment preference for this ensemble is given to accomplished players and vocalists who read music notation. Others may be admitted at the director's discretion. 1 credit

Intro to Theater Tech: In this Theater Tech Boot Camp you will develop the skills to become a backstage superstar! Throughout the trimester, you will learn about theater safety, stage management, props, construction and painting techniques, as well as lighting, sound and scenic design. While learning the ins and outs of technical theater through hands-on experience, you will be given a chance to earn Sole-certifications that will allow you to move into our after school Theater Tech Program as well as our SoleStage-Theater Tech class. 1 credit

Rock Band: Rock Band plays contemporary and classic rock. Come get the experience of what it feels like to be in a band. Learn about rehearsing a band, and how to make an exciting arrangement for a band. Get into stage presence and performance skills. Rock Band is a performance based group, and gives feature concerts. Vocalists and instrumentalists are welcome. Prior music playing is expected for this class. Prerequisite: Instrumental Proficiency. 1 credit

Tap Dance: This American dance form allows performers to make percussion noises with their feet to rhythms. Students will learn basic tap steps and how to put them in combinations with one another. The class will research tap dancers from the beginning to now and also tap companies. This is a performance based class and the students will be dancing at the spring concert. 1 credit

Shakespearean Acting: This course is a fun and extremely interactive study of Shakespeare's dramatic works from the point of view of the actor. It is important to remember that Shakespeare's verse dramas were written to be performed and that only when they are approached this way as playable, theatrical texts do they have their maximum impact. Through text analysis, scene study, vocal work, and acting exercises we attempt to find not only the meaning, but the music and theatrical power of Shakespeare's words. If you have ever been afraid of or bored by Shakespeare, this class will help you find your inner Bard! No Prerequisite, 1 credit

SoleStage - Theater Tech: This class is designed to give you the experience of apprenticing in a real working scene shop. Lessons and projects will be designed in conjunction with our Main Stage production each trimester and will give you hands-on experience working on a show--from design to completion. Each trimester will consist of different challenges and new projects allowing you to hone your craft while creating spectacular scenic elements that can be added to your technical theater portfolio. Students enrolled in this class will also have priority placement in our after school Theater Tech Program. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Intro to Theater Tech. 1 credit

Studio Music Production: This class will teach the basics of computer music production from concept and pre-production through production and mixing. We will use the software "Fruity Loops" to create hip-hop and electronic beats utilizing both sample-based production techniques and from the ground up original ideas. We will take the best ideas and turn them into songs, recording vocals and live instruments over top of them. Historical information will be imparted and discussed as we traverse the broad genres of both hip-hop and electronic music, discovering where they started, what they meant and where they intersect. A Venn diagram will be drawn at some point in red dry-erase marker to see where there is overlap between the two both in sound and culture. Although different on the surface culturally, they draw from the same pool of inspiration, sounds, and technology; making these the most important genres of the last 30 years. In short: We will be producing beats, writing songs, and recording vocals. 1 credit


Computers

The Computer Department offers courses in the Arts as well as coding. More advanced work includes self-paced programming and web design.


FULL-YEAR COURSE

Digital Filmmaking, Script to Screen: In this yearlong course, students will write, produce, and edit short films. This course will provide hands-on experience in production planning, writing, and acting for the camera, as well as lighting, digital cinematography, audio recording, and non-linear editing. The class will meet twice a week during an Arts block; however due to the nature of the assignments some time outside of regular class will be necessary. This course will emphasize the development of skills to use creative thinking for problem solving. A willingness to work as part of a team is a prerequisite, as all projects will be accomplished in groups. 3 credits


FALL TRIMESTER

Digital Design, Text, Print, & Web: This class will explore a range of layout and design styles throughout history, and show the differences and similarities between print and web publications. Some amount of time will be devoted to typography and a “best of” from Johannes Gutenberg to the present, showing changes in public preference in the look of type in print and advertising. The students will design and build an “advertising campaign” for the Solebury art department, both in print and on the web, using student and faculty art as content. ADOBE INDESIGN, PHOTOSHOP, ILLUSTRATOR 1 credit

Computer Programming: This course provides a basic introduction to computer programming with a current programming language. Student may choose a language with teacher approval. No prior knowledge of programming required. Students will cover how to program input, output, and decisions, and learn to use current computer programming tools and methodologies. Additionally we will discuss current topics and trends in computing. There is no requirement for purchasing an additional computer as the work can be done online using applications such as the Jupyter notebook. (http://jupyter.org) Students who are able progress at a faster rate will have the option to do advanced work at their own pace with teacher approval. 1 credit

Video Editing: This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of nonlinear video editing. The student will gain an understanding of video formats and concepts of video and audio compression used in recording, editing, and for final display. Cutting techniques will be explored including concepts of continuity, frame matching, using varying angles effectively, editing multi camera footage, techniques to avoid jump cuts and the use of parallel action. An introduction to sound editing will include fundamentals of mixing for film, Foley effects and processing audio to enhance the audience experience. Students will use the following software in this course: Adobe Premiere Pro, Adobe Aftereffects, Adobe Audition, Adobe Photo Shop and Adobe Media Encoder. 1 credit


WINTER TRIMESTER

Computer Aided Drawing (AutoCAD): CAD drafting is the language that architects, planners, and other designers use to communicate with one another on collaborative projects and with builders or fabrication shops. The process allows the viewing of the idea you've had in a scaled relationship, to check that the rooms, moving parts, etc. will fit together and function properly. The drafting process aids in graphic thinking and suggests new avenues of design exploration. No Prerequisite, 1 credit.

Computer Programming: This course provides a basic introduction to computer programming with a current programming language. Student may choose a language with teacher approval. No prior knowledge of programming required. Students will cover how to program input, output, and decisions, and learn to use current computer programming tools and methodologies. Additionally we will discuss current topics and trends in computing. There is no requirement for purchasing an additional computer as the work can be done online using applications such as the Jupyter notebook. (http://jupyter.org) Students who are able progress at a faster rate will have the option to do advanced work at their own pace with teacher approval. 1 credit

Digital Design: Illustration, Manipulation & Animation: This class will develop students’ digital art skill-set by viewing the computer as a tool for augmenting handmade (pen & and ink / pencil drawing, charcoal, watercolor, photography, videography) artwork. Digital manipulation of student and faculty artwork will be the vehicle for teaching the various specialized functions and specific uses of each software package. Some time will be spent stressing how the human element and inconsistent lines / brush strokes, small mistakes, and imperfections in medium can subconsciously differentiate our perception of digital art from “warm and real” to “cold and sterile.” The students will each conceptualize and complete a 30-second animation about art and technology for display on our website and blog. ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR, PHOTOSHOP, AFTER EFFECTS. 1 credit

Video Editing: This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of nonlinear video editing. The student will gain an understanding of video formats and concepts of video and audio compression used in recording, editing, and for final display. Cutting techniques will be explored including concepts of continuity, frame matching, using varying angles effectively, editing multi camera footage, techniques to avoid jump cuts and the use of parallel action. An introduction to sound editing will include fundamentals of mixing for film, Foley effects and processing audio to enhance the audience experience. Students will use the following software in this course: Adobe Premiere Pro, Adobe Aftereffects, Adobe Audition, Adobe Photo Shop and Adobe Media Encoder. 1 credit


SPRING TRIMESTER

Computer Programming: This course provides a basic introduction to computer programming with a current programming language. Student may choose a language with teacher approval. No prior knowledge of programming required. Students will cover how to program input, output, and decisions, and learn to use current computer programming tools and methodologies. Additionally we will discuss current topics and trends in computing. There is no requirement for purchasing an additional computer as the work can be done online using applications such as the Jupyter notebook. ( Students who are able progress at a faster rate will have the option to do advanced work at their own pace with teacher approval. 1 credit

Studio Music Production: This class will teach the basics of computer music production from concept and pre-production through production and mixing. We will use the software "Fruity Loops" to create hip-hop and electronic beats utilizing both sample-based production techniques and from the ground up original ideas. We will take the best ideas and turn them into songs, recording vocals and live instruments over top of them. Historical information will be imparted and discussed as we traverse the broad genres of both hip-hop and electronic music, discovering where they started, what they meant and where they intersect. A Venn diagram will be drawn at some point in red dry-erase marker to see where there is overlap between the two both in sound and culture. Although different on the surface culturally, they draw from the same pool of inspiration, sounds, and technology; making these the most important genres of the last 30 years. In short: We will be producing beats, writing songs, and recording vocals. 1 credit

Video Editing: This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of nonlinear video editing. The student will gain an understanding of video formats and concepts of video and audio compression used in recording, editing, and for final display. Cutting techniques will be explored including concepts of continuity, frame matching, using varying angles effectively, editing multi camera footage, techniques to avoid jump cuts and the use of parallel action. An introduction to sound editing will include fundamentals of mixing for film, Foley effects and processing audio to enhance the audience experience. Students will use the following software in this course: Adobe Premiere Pro, Adobe Aftereffects, Adobe Audition, Adobe Photo Shop and Adobe Media Encoder. 1 credit

English as a Second Language

Solebury ESL (English as a Second Language) is a 3 year program built on content and skills courses in three interconnected levels:

  • a Foundations Level designed to develop language skills and introduce American culture and educational expectations,
  • an Intermediate Level designed to solidify language skills and begin the mainstream transition process,
  • a Transitions Level designed to ensure students are fully prepared to succeed in the American system going forward.

TOEFL scores are only used for determining a student’s entry level into the program. Once accepted into the program, students commit themselves to the entire process, completing all required courses from the point at which they enter the program. Then they follow the established path until they are fully mainstreamed.

TOEFL scores are NOT used to exit the program before it has been completed. For example: a student who joins the program at the Intermediate level must complete all the required courses at the Intermediate Level, then all the required courses at the Transitions Level before completing the program to become a “full mainstream” student.

Foundations Level courses:

  • Introduction to Listening and Speaking
  • Introduction to Grammar and Writing
  • Introduction to Reading
  • American Culture through the Media
  • Mainstream math (level determined by placement test)

At the Foundations Level students do not receive course grades at the end of the first trimester. This is done to give students time to become comfortable with the American system of education (and the challenges of learning a second language.) We believe that if students do not have to worry about grades in their first trimester, they can focus on all aspects of Solebury life, and better adapt to their new environment. This gives students more opportunities for success as they proceed forward.

Intermediate Level courses:

  • Listening and Speaking for Success
  • Advanced Grammar and Reading
  • Physical, Human, and Political Geography
  • Mainstream Conceptual Physics
  • Mainstream math (level determined by placement test)

The Intermediate Level is a crucial step in the program where essential content is learned and necessary skills are strengthened, even though very few outward signs of “English as a Second Language” remain. 7

Transitions Level courses:

  • Writing Portfolio
  • Reading Strategies
  • Introduction to Western Civilization
  • Mainstream Chemistry
  • Mainstream math (according to level of placement)

By the time students enter the Transitions Level, all traces of traditional ESL are gone. No class has the “ESL” label, and all courses use mainstream textbooks.

This means, depending on the entrance level to the ESL Program, students will have, at most, only two years of ESL as indicated on their transcript.

For ALL LEVELS: students may take classes in art, music, and computer skills.

Additionally students will be involved in sports, clubs, weekend adventures, community service, and dormitory activities. Students will receive instruction in how to develop independence and strong peer relationships. They will be encouraged to express their ideas and opinions openly, thereby instilling confidence in preparation for leadership positions in the future. The three level program is described below:

Foundations

Introduction to Grammar and Writing: In this course, students learn the foundation of academic writing for American English. Students learn how to place together sentences, paragraphs, and ideas to form coherent papers and longer essays. Students also learn basic syntax and grammar construction, which is applied directly to their written work. There are frequent tests/quizzes, papers, oral exams, and creative projects to showcase their work. Topics covered are word order, definite/indefinite articles, -ing/- ed adjectives, conjunctions, punctuation, capitalization, transitions, and simple and continuous present/past verb tenses. 6 credits

American Culture through the Media: Based on the premise that exposure to popular culture leads to accelerated English improvement, this course offers students a thorough experience of American culture, while providing them with a natural way to improve their language skills. Students not only become familiar with some classic American stories and characters, but also get a chance to learn about, and practice, classic American rituals and traditions. A student who completes this course should be able to comfortably interact with an American family, just as if they had been in the U.S. for years. 6 credits

Introduction to Reading: ESL Introduction to Reading is a course designed to improve the written, spoken, listening, and reading skills of students, while at the same time providing them with a basic understanding of the elements and mechanics of narrative fiction. Using primarily short stories, students will first come to understand the basics of story structure such as setting, character, plot, and conflict. Then they will use stories to make a closer examination of literary techniques such as imagery, irony, and symbolism. Active reading and intensive writing practice will be augmented by numerous opportunities for class discussion. 6 credits

Introduction to Listening and Speaking: This is a course designed for learners who are just developing language proficiency to achieve the goal of producing natural sounding English. The course begins with an intensive study of vowel and consonant sounds and their corresponding symbols, in addition to learning and practicing word stress and rhythm, as well as intonation. This is integrated into thematic units which target idioms and ‘word knowledge’ with an emphasis on prefixes, suffixes, synonyms and antonyms. Students then learn how to incorporate their new vocabulary into complete, grammatically correct sentences, short stories, conversations, and role plays. 6 credits

Intermediate

Listening and Speaking for Success: The course begins with an intensive study of vowel and consonant sounds and their corresponding symbols in conjunction with rhythm, stress, intonation, and sentence patterns. This is accomplished through dictation, song, limericks, activities in the Sanako Language Lab, games, and pair practice. This is followed by techniques and practice in discussions and conversations through improvisation and role play. Elementary impromptu, entertaining, persuasive, and “how to” speeches are more formal activities to incorporate speaking skills, content, general delivery as well as to instill confidence. The final phase of this course is to teach students how to listen for substance and to isolate essential information. This is accomplished through the use of tapes, videos, and lectures. By the end of the course, it is expected that students will be able to differentiate between sounds in order to apply this to their speaking and listening skills, and to have a better understanding of word and sentence structure patterns, so they are more comfortable carrying on a conversation with native English speakers. 6 credits

Advanced Grammar and Reading: A grammar-intensive class for intermediate ESL students. Students learn the fundamentals of formal English including verb tenses, articles, prepositions, modals, modifiers, word order, parts of speech, etc. Students also write one-page journals each week in which they apply the grammar they learned in class to their writing. An introduction to short stories is also presented throughout the year. 6 credits

Physical, Human, and Political Geography: This course will provide students with essential concepts, vocabulary, and skills necessary to understand humans’ interactions with their environment. This begins with a comprehensive tour of the Earth and its landforms (in English), moves to study topics like economics and globalization, and finishes with a close-up look at North America and Europe. Traditional tests as well as projects are used to boost student written and spoken English skills, and provide them with an understanding of their role in the larger world. 6 credits

Transitions

Reading Strategies: This is a thematic approach to literature focusing on a wide variety of genres. Each selection includes a particular literary element and reading skill to learn and apply. A list of vocabulary words is assigned from each story and discussed in context. Discussion of the selection then follows in which students must hone their critical thinking and analytical skills. In addition, a novel will be assigned each trimester for independent reading followed by a project, which focuses on writing and knowledge of grammar, usage, mechanics, and editing skills. This course will provide the basics for mainstream English courses. 6 credits

Introduction to Western Civilization: This course will provide students with a thorough and detailed understanding of the various cultures and historical milestones that shaped our current idea of "The West." By reading 10th grade level texts, original sources, and supplemental articles, student will receive crucial study skills practice; and have numerous opportunities to demonstrate their understanding through written responses, projects, and one complete research paper. Having been immersed in some of Western Civilization's most famous characters and events will position students for further study of American history, as well as some college-level courses. 6 credits

Writing Portfolio: In this class, students will learn to write in various genres. In the fall, the focus is on formal compositions, including informative; compare-and-contrast; biographical and autobiographical; cause-and-effect; persuasive; cause-and-effect; and how-to essays. In the winter, students learn how to conduct and write lengthy research papers. The spring trimester is spent focusing on creative and informal writing, including short stories; poetry; myths; narratives; and descriptive essays. There is significant emphasis placed on grammar, mechanics, and organization all year. 6 credits

Learning Skills

The Learning Skills Program is limited to 24 students with learning differences. A one-on-one tutorial replaces the students' English class (counting for their six-credits of English each year). Students spend at least one 80-minute period per day in the Learning Skills building. Half of that period is for the study of English and the other forty minutes are for study time with their LS teacher. Although students in this program receive a waiver of the foreign language requirement, they otherwise take the same college preparatory classes everyone else takes in mathematics, science, history, and the arts. This program requires an additional fee.


ACCOMMODATIONS FOR STUDENTS WITH LEARNING DIFFERENCES

Over the years, students with learning differences have often been honor students, outstanding artists, star athletes, and student leaders at Solebury School. We value these students and make reasonable accommodations to help them achieve in a challenging academic community. What follows is a summary of the kinds of help that are and are not available.

An important strength of Solebury’s Learning Skills Program (LSP) is that it exists within a collegepreparatory school. It is assumed that students in the LSP have chosen Solebury’s LD program because it is a college-preparatory program and a mainstream program (with LSP support). Their diploma is a regular Solebury diploma, not a special-program diploma. LSP students take pride in knowing that they have met the same standards other students meet. Because LSP students, as well as a number of other students at Solebury, have learning differences, Solebury will make whatever reasonable and appropriate accommodations it can to help students meet those standards. Accommodation, however, does not mean changing the standards themselves. LSP students, and other students with learning differences, should expect to read the same texts, attend the same classes (except as noted above), complete the same projects, write the same papers, and take the same tests as their classmates without learning differences.

Because Solebury is a small independent school with an emphasis on creativity, innovation, and individuality, some features are commonly available to all students, whether or not they have learning differences. These include:

  • Small class size
  • A safe learning environment of mutual respect
  • Regularly scheduled extra-help conferences
  • Opportunities for peer tutoring or study groups
  • Use of computers for word-processing or other tasks
  • Creative, innovative teaching

Solebury teachers have a great deal of freedom in designing their courses and establishing classroom policies. Some teachers, for example, routinely allow extra time for tests, others only by special arrangement. Some teachers often give open-book tests; others never do. Although many non-LSP teachers are experienced at tailoring lessons to individual learning styles, it is safest to assume that not all non-LSP teachers have this expertise. Therefore, when accommodations are needed, the Learning Skills teacher is the primary advocate on campus. The LS teacher will make arrangements with the student’s other teachers, who are not specially trained in teaching students with learning differences, so that the student has the maximum chance of acquiring the skills and knowledge taught in those classes.

Accommodations will vary on a case-by-case basis, and all accommodations need to be arranged in advance. Although LS teachers act as advocates, a key goal of the LSP is to teach students to advocate for themselves, as they will need to in college. Other students with diagnosed learning differences, or their parents, may request that the Director of Studies or the Director of the LSP serve as the student’s advocate. Below is a list of the sorts of accommodations that can be made if appropriate for the individual and if arranged in advance (in some cases like extended time for tests, it’s not possible to blanket arrange the accommodation and it must be set up for every test).


ACCOMMODATIONS THAT MAY BE GRANTED BY ARRANGEMENT

  • Textbooks on tape
  • Extended (but not unlimited) time for tests
  • Permission to copy another student’s class notes or, if available, the teacher’s notes
  • Note-taking accommodation to use a SmartPen
  • Permission to use a laptop computer or other electronic aid in class
  • Use of a word processor for tests and quizzes
  • Test directions (or whole tests) read aloud
  • Permission to take tests in a more distraction-free environment
  • Limited oral testing to supplement written tests
  • Alternate demonstrations of competence or extra-credit assignments, if deemed appropriate
  • Homework assignment book checks
  • Frequent reminders of deadlines
  • Extra advance notice of written assignments
  • Reasonable extensions of deadlines if requested in advance
  • Preferential classroom seating
  • Conferences with teachers as appropriate
  • Regular telephone or e-mail reports to parents by advisors or LS teachers
  • Duplicate texts (available for purchase in the bookstore)

However, it is important to let families know that some accommodations will not be possible, either because we are such a small school or because we feel they could not be implemented without compromising standards. Below is a partial list:


ACCOMMODATIONS THAT CANNOT BE GRANTED

  • Texts of a reading-level or difficulty lower than those used by the class
  • Shorter assignments than those for other students in the class
  • Versions in writing of classroom activities
  • Adaptive testing that avoids course requirements or skills taught in the course
  • Use of electronic aids when test security would be compromised (i.e., spell checker in spelling test)
  • Grades based primarily on effort or improvement rather than achievement
  • Exemption from major course requirements, including homework and class attendance
  • Printed course syllabi
  • Formal written reports to parents beyond those provided for all students

Middle School

The Identity, Connection and Change (ICC) Program

Identity, Connection and Change (ICC) is our academic theme in the Middle School. Curriculum for English, History and Science is based on an interdisciplinary approach. Throughout the course students will develop a sense of their strengths as they learn new material and master new intellectual, social, emotional and physical skills. The curriculum provides opportunities that promote the transition from concrete operations to a more complex thinking process in a supportive, academic environment of mutual respect. Students in ICC will consider diverse ideas, develop respect for their peers, engage in community service and cultivate sensitivity to the needs of the larger community.

The Middle School experience builds upon the skills students developed in elementary school and eases the transition to Solebury’s Upper School. Learning involves writing and speaking, exploring, collecting, sharing, questioning, analyzing, creating, editing, and presenting. To enhance the learning process, we will schedule field trips tied to the curriculum throughout each trimester. Our curriculum is also enhanced by classes in the arts and takes a holistic approach that will help students make connections between their academic classes and the arts.

ICC Physical Science: This is a hands-on, inquiry-based course. We begin the year learning about space and the stars above us, move into metric conversions, scientific method, and conservation of matter. Then, end the year with solubility, and atomic theory. Students will perform experiments, gather data and draw conclusions based on their evidence. Throughout the year we will touch on topics that are interwoven into their ICC History and ICC English class. The emphasis throughout the year will be on learning through experimentation. Required; ICC Physical Science is intended for 7th and 8th graders. 6 credits

ICC English: The goal of this class is to expose students to the ways in which society developed and explore how literature helps us both understand the world we live in, and imagine the world we wish we could inhabit. As part of the ICC program’s integrated curriculum, this course will encourage students to explore the connections between literature, history, their environment, and personal identity. Students will deepen skills of textual analysis and will be able to understand and interpret both fictional and nonfictional works. The year is divided by trimester into three thematic units, focusing on subjects that include mythology, utopia, dystopia, and social change. Throughout the year, students will work on writing and grammar with a variety of self-reflective, creative, and expository writing assignments as well as pointed vocabulary lessons to deepen students’ understanding of the course readings. Required; ICC English is intended for 7th and 8th graders. 6 credits

ICC History: The goal of the ICC History class is to encourage students to think critically about increasingly complex material in a fun and creative environment. We will look at the key questions raised in the ICC program through historical and literary lenses (the English and History will dovetail and offer complementary content). ICC History will also focus on expository and research writing and there will also be an emphasis on critical reading to understand perspective and bias. The students will also begin learning the process of research in order to answer the questions of history and provide sufficient evidence when making claims. In conjunction with the work students will engage in English, students will learn to listen, think, question, and express their opinions confidently about a variety of issues. Required; ICC History is intended for 7th and 8th graders. 6 credits

WORLD LANGUAGE: World Language and Culture. The World Language and Culture class is designed to give our new middle school students an introductory experience of each of the languages offered by Solebury: French and Spanish. Fall trimester students will be in a study skills class to help transition into Solebury School. Winter and Spring, students will complete one trimester of each language by exploring the languages and cultures through dynamic activities and practice. Through this course progression, students develop global competence and cultural sensitivity while learning the fundamental 63 skills of language study. Students who have completed this course with strong results may then opt to enroll in French I or Spanish I, which would then put them on track to reach the Advanced Placement level by the time they reach 12th grade. World Language and Culture is intended for 7th and 8th graders. 6 credits

MATHEMATICS: Pre-Algebra: This course studies the mathematical concepts that are essential prerequisites for Algebra I. Arithmetic operations using the rational number system are examined, with an emphasis placed on signed numbers. Students review and extend their knowledge of ratios, proportions, percentage, exponents, basic geometry, probability, mental math, and the metric system. They learn to solve multi-step equations and inequalities, graph linear equations, and use scientific notation. Independent work as well as group work is used as a teaching tool to foster student learning and throughout the course an emphasis is placed on critical thinking skills using word problems and problem solving situations. To prepare for the demands of a high school mathematics course, study strategies, organization, and note taking techniques are underlying skills that Pre-Algebra students develop and practice throughout the year. Pre-Algebra is intended for 7th and 8th graders. 6 credits.

Some middle school students may be ready to take more advanced mathematics courses for high school credit.


Supporting Program for the Middle School

The Middle School Introduction to the Arts program is designed to expose students to the various types of

arts classes that they may take in Solebury’s upper school. Each year of middle school, students will participate in several branches of the arts.

In the Fall, students will take Introduction to the Arts: Guitar. This class is a group performance class for beginners of guitar. Students will learn the basics on the guitar, including how to tune the instrument, theory, reading treble clef, basic rhythms, and simple chords. There will be a focus on learning to listen and play in groups, and we will learn some songs with common chord progressions, and experience singing while accompanying. Performing a group piece is a requirement for passing the class. Required; Prerequisite: None. Introduction to the Arts: Music is intended for 7th and 8th graders. 1 credit

In the winter, students will take Introduction to the Arts: Robotics. This class is designed to be an educational and entertaining single trimester introduction to Robotics and applied STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) concepts. We will utilize a variety of resources including Lego Mindstorms EV3 robotics kits to design basic robotic and mechanical systems while we explore the concepts of logic and design that make our systems complete their expected tasks. This class does not require extensive computer skills as a prerequisite. Group and project based learning will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: None. Introduction to Robotics is intended for 7th and 8th graders. 1 credit

In the spring, students will take Introduction to the Arts: Theater, an introductory theater class designed to develop students’ abilities to take on a role, enhance their confidence in front of an audience, and work collaboratively to stage a performance. The course culminates with a play performance in the evening for parents. Performing in the play is a requirement for passing the class. Required; Prerequisite: None. Introduction to the Arts: Theater is intended for 7th and 8th graders. 1 credit

Middle School Fitness: Offered all three trimesters, our students will learn how to lead healthier lives, physically and emotionally. In fitness, the students learn the importance of group dynamics and also injury prevention. Students who do not participate in a 5 day/week sport are required to take PE. This course is pass/fail. Prerequisite: none. Middle School Fitness is intended for 7th and 8th graders.


Global Education Concentration

Rising 9th and 10th grade students may choose to declare a focus in global education. This concentration aims to cultivate globally-minded young adults by providing a path for them to deeply engage in and reflect upon global academic courses, cultural events, service learning, travel immersion experiences, and an independent study. If you have any questions about Solebury School’s Global Education Concentration, please contact Global Education Director Nicole Mount at nmount@solebury.org or 215.862.5261.

Academics

A course will be designated as an option for the Global Education Concentration if the curriculum requires students to critically examine various cultures and global issues through texts, films, discussions, assignments, and projects. Specific courses will be outlined on course selection sheets with a “(G)”. For 2017-18, these courses are: Art History, Refugee Voices, World Religions, Honors Environmental Science, Moral Conflicts, World History 9, Ethics, Cultural Anthropology, International Horror Lit, South African Short Fiction, Architecture and Design, Linguistic Anthropology, World Mythology, Archaeology, and all World Language classes

  • 24 credits total; 12 credits in non-World Language coursework
  • enrolled in at least one Global Education course each year (full-year or trimester elective)
  • enrolled in an ESL or World Language course each year
  • have a combined total of 12 credits in junior and senior year


Cultural Events

examples: film, museum, speaker, performance, workshop, summer program, festival

  • attend a minimum of 4 Solebury School sponsored cultural events per academic year; written reflection submitted to the Global Education Director
  • attend a minimum of 6 non-Solebury School sponsored cultural events per academic year; written reflection submitted to the Global Education Director
  • assist in organizing one on-campus cultural event; written reflection submitted to the Global Education Director


Service Learning

  • 16 hours of community engagement with a cultural/global focus each academic year (in addition to Solebury School requirement)
  • may be completed as part of a travel immersion experience if approved by the Global Education Committee


Travel Immersion Experience

  • minimum of five days spent in a non-native language area, planned through Solebury School or ones’ own (approved by the global education committee)
  • focus of the trip consists of more than strictly sightseeing
  • detailed itinerary and written reflection submitted to the Global Education Director
  • presentation to the student body and/or Global Education Committee


Independent Study

  • independent study and/or project completed in junior or senior year; approved by the Global Education Committee (can be completed during senior project)
  • study/project concludes in a presentation and/or paper